New guest contributor for ASAP Instagram

ASAP Instagram Guest Contributor: Taapsi Ramachandani, @anthofpolicy

Taapsi Ramchandani is a blogger and PhD candidate in cultural anthropology at Syracuse University. For her doctoral research, she is exploring forms of civic engagement in Trinidad and Tobago with a particular focus on the inter-personal relationships between civilians and their local elected representatives.

Trinidad, the larger of the twin-island nation-state, currently has a centralized local government system with low levels of professionalization and high prevalence of clientelism. Within this context, Taapsi is interested in the creative ways by which locals make themselves “visible” to their elected leaders to access public services, get public assistance, and demand good governance. Over the next two weeks, she will use photographs to paint a picture of everyday life in her fieldsite where religion, technology and livelihood arbitrate people’s expectations from their political leaders, especially as the country braces for local government elections in December 2016.

If you are interested in acting as a guest contributor to the ASAP Instagram, please send a sample photo and narrative to Georgia Hartman at [email protected].


Visiting Fellow
Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies
The University of California, San Diego

Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Anthropology
The University of California, Irvine

Email: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

Job posting: Assistant professor in environmental/energy justice

Please note this policy-focused position at Michigan Technological University. We have a graduate program in Environmental and Energy Policy.

C. MacLennan

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Assistant Professor in Environmental/Energy Justice, Tenure-Track Department of Social Sciences Michigan Technological University

The Department of Social Sciences at Michigan Technological University invites applications for an Assistant Professor to join an interdisciplinary social sciences faculty. We seek a scholar specializing in environmental and/or energy justice. Candidates with strengths in policy analysis and/or spatial methodologies are especially encouraged to apply.

Candidates should be prepared to teach one or more courses that articulate with undergraduate programs in Anthropology, History, or Law & Society. Applicants should also demonstrate how their research and teaching interests strengthen our graduate programs (MS and PhD) in Environmental & Energy Policy and/or Industrial Heritage and Archaeology. A Ph.D. in Anthropology, Geography, History, Political Science, Sociology or a related interdisciplinary field is required by August 15, 2017.

The successful candidate will demonstrate a strong research record and agenda, as well as high potential for securing external funding. Teaching experience is strongly preferred. The teaching load is two courses per semester. Michigan Tech is a research university (RU/H) with approximately 7,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Located minutes from Lake Superior in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, the Houghton/Hancock community offers year-round recreational and cultural opportunities.

Michigan Tech is an Equal Opportunity Educational Institution/Equal Opportunity Employer, which includes providing equal opportunity for protected veterans and individuals with disabilities. Applications from women and minorities are highly encouraged by both the department and the institution. Michigan Tech is an ADVANCE institution, one of a limited number of universities in receipt of NSF funds in support of our commitment to increase diversity and the participation and advancement of women in STEM. Michigan Tech acknowledges the importance of supporting dual career partners in attracting and retaining a quality workforce. See www.dual.mtu.edu for additional information.

Applications will be reviewed starting November 15, 2016. Full consideration will be given to applications received by that date. Interested candidates should complete the online application and upload required materials including: (1) a letter of interest, (2) Curriculum Vitae, (3) research statement, (4) teaching statement, (5) writing sample(s)and (6) names and contact information for three references. Letters of reference will be requested for candidates making the short list.

You can find out more about this position, including where to submit your online application, at: http://www.jobs.mtu.edu/postings/4766

Please direct inquiries to Dr. Chelsea Schelly at [email protected] or 906 487 1759.

More about the Department and University

The Department of Social Sciences consists of faculty who represent diverse disciplinary backgrounds within the social sciences. The Department offers undergraduate degree programs in anthropology, history, and social science and M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Industrial Heritage and Archaeology and in Environmental and Energy Policy. We contribute to campus-wide general education and collaborate with research partners across the university. Michigan Tech is a mid-sized public research university with 130 degree programs in arts, humanities, and social sciences; business and economics; computing; engineering; forestry and environmental science; natural and physical sciences; and technology. Michigan Tech is ranked in the top tier of national universities according to U.S. News & World Report’s “America’s Best Colleges 2015.” The student-faculty ratio is 13:1 and 49% of classes have fewer than 20 students. The university values cross-disciplinary faculty and student contributions to global sustainability. Michigan Tech is committed to offering career exploration advice and assistance whenever feasible and appropriate at the University and in the local community. See www.dual.mtu.edu for more information.

Houghton/Hancock

Michigan Tech is located in Houghton, MI in the heart of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. Houghton was rated as the 15th Greatest Place to Live in America by Outside Magazine in 2014. It is also rated as a top summer travel destination, one of the Top 10 outdoor adventure spots in the country for our bike trails, and is well known for its Olympic-caliber cross country ski trails, Lake Superior shoreline, and numerous inland lakes and rivers. Situated on the hills bordering the beautiful Portage Waterway and only minutes from several Lake Superior beaches, the area offers a bounty of cultural and recreational opportunities. The historic downtown waterfront provides unique shopping, dining, and cultural opportunities in addition to serving as the mainland headquarters for Isle Royale National Park. Local schools are known for their high quality and commitment to being one of the top five districts for student performance in the state of Michigan. The Houghton County Memorial Airport offers jet service to and from Chicago twice daily on United Airlines. This environment, combined with a competitive compensation package, results in an excellent quality of life.

Next ASAP Instagram: Casler on Nicaraguan health care

ASAP Instagram Guest Contributor: Jessica-Jean Casler, @anthofpolicy

Jessica-Jean Casler is a recently graduated medical and cultural anthropologist. Her work looks at health inequities, development, health policy, and dance in Matagalpa, Nicaragua.

Over the next two weeks, Jessica-Jean will share experiences of Nicaragua’s healthcare system. She pays special attention to short-term medical missions (STMMs), NGOs, and other actors integrating into the existing systems of care.

If you are interested in acting as a guest contributor to the ASAP Instagram, please send a sample photo and narrative to Georgia Hartman at [email protected].


Visiting Fellow
Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies
The University of California, San Diego

Ph.D. Candidate
Department of Anthropology
The University of California, Irvine

Email: [email protected], [email protected], [email protected]

Call for papers: Panel on extraction policy in U.S.

Dear Colleagues:

I am organizing a panel for SfAA in Santa Fe (March 28-April 1) on Extraction Policy in the US. Those who work on mining, oil, or gas extraction issues encounter the policy process that governs permitting, waste cleanup, citizen engagement, and rules for decision-making. I welcome papers that provide insights into the multiple levels of extraction policy (federal, state, local) across multiple domains (hardrock mining, coal, oil, gas, and other extractions). Topics can include investigations of policies themselves or of community experience with policy processes in extraction.

My goal is to begin a discussion that focuses on the policy landscape from the point of view of extraction communities. Extraction policy is multi-faceted and extremely complex for citizens and communities to grasp. Embedded in these policies are assumptions about citizen rights, extraction economies, and environmental consequences that drive the decision-process. Also, extraction studies have progressed significantly such that we have many cases that illuminate community experience with extraction politics and policies. It is a good time to begin to assess extraction policy itself. Policy anthropologists, and political ecologists, and those in the ExtrACTION network have important insights to contribute here.

If you are interested, please send me a note by Saturday, October 8. Include your 100-word abstract and your name and affiliation. I will respond to all by Monday, October 10. Once the panel is organized, I will revise the panel title and abstract as needed to reflect the general approach of the papers. Once you hear back from me, you can then submit your abstract on the SfAA website. Remember that you have to register before you can submit your abstract. The final deadline to submit your abstract is October 15.

Tentative Title:
Extraction Policy in the US: Making sense of mining, oil, and gas policies and how communities engage the policy landscape

Tentative Panel Abstract:
How does extraction policy work in the US? How do communities navigate the complex rules that constitute extraction policy? The policy landscape for mining, oil and gas development, and other resource extraction is a complex fabric woven together by multiple state and corporate actors and has a profound effect on the ability of communities to live with and regulate the impact of resource extraction.  Papers in this panel investigate extraction from a policy angle with an eye toward explaining how communities engage the policies that establish the rules of extraction decision-making.

Carol MacLennan
Professor of Anthropology
Michigan Technological University
Email: [email protected]