Call for papers: New refugee movements

American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

In-Between States: New Refugee Movements and State Responses

Organizers:
Caitlin Fouratt ([email protected]), CSU, Long Beach
Leila Rodriguez ([email protected]), University of Cincinnati
Joseph Wiltberger ([email protected]), CSU, Northridge

The current U.S. administration’s attempts to block refugee flows to the U.S., as well as anti-refugee sentiment and immigration restrictions in other receiving countries, points to recent shifts toward rejecting refugees and the claims of asylum-seekers by states supposedly expected to be able to absorb such flows and to follow international guidelines to recognize refugees arriving at their door. We are witnessing a moment when the international asylum regime is being challenged and resisted, which has resulted in new and unexpected migratory flows and social consequences.

“Traditional” countries of resettlement are turning to other countries of refuge, offshore processing centers, and other solutions to prevent the arrival of refugees or delay permanent resettlement. Linked to this is the recent observation of refugee/asylee flows toward less expected destinations, their liminal permanence in transit and in-between states, as well as questions about how those unexpected states are handling new influxes. European states and the U.S. have responded to the Syrian refugee crisis with immigration restrictions in a climate of intense xenophobia. Mexico and Costa Rica have become the hosts of significant numbers of Haitians, West Africans, and “Northern Triangle” Central Americans. These groups, among others, encounter heightened border enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border and at borders further south, making it more difficult to reach the U.S. Further, the U.S. is now looking to Central American countries to create mechanisms for identifying and vetting asylum-seekers in place, including a Transfer Protection Agreement with Costa Rica. Globally, refugees and asylum-seekers can be found taking extreme risks or waiting indefinitely to cross international borders, in detention en masse, and settling in unexpected places.

Building on scholarship on refugee policy and the proliferation of precarious statuses, this panel seeks papers that examine the theoretical, political, and social implications of these shifts. We invite papers that address human rights consequences of deporting or denying entry to those fleeing violence and persecution; the political and social responses of states where asylum seekers are unexpectedly arriving; and ethnographic examinations of the situation of refugees caught in limbo or found in new places. What happens when countries of transit become de facto countries of settlement? When temporary arrangements become permanent or extend indefinitely?  What role can anthropology play in the examination of the experiences of refugees  and asylum seekers caught in these in-between states?

Please e-mail proposed paper titles and abstracts (max. 250 words) to the organizers listed above by 5:00 pm, April 7th. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by April 9th.

 

Call for papers: Screen-level bureaucracy

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Screen-level Bureaucracy: Organizational Encounters in the Digitized and Automated World

Organizer: Kelly McKowen, Princeton University
Abstracts are due to [email protected] by April 7

The traditional image of the encounter between an individual and a bureaucratic organization involves at least two actors meeting physically across a desk or a table. As a growing share of private and public organizations embrace digitization, automation, and artificial intelligence, however, this image has become in many cases a poor representation of how people actually meet and experience bureaucracy. From banks and businesses to schools and welfare offices, many of the organizations people interact with present themselves less through physical, built spaces and more via the computer-, tablet-, and mobile phone-mediated artifacts of the digital world. In turn, the experience of bureaucracy, which previous ethnographic and qualitative scholarship has shown be a significant space of political claim-making and the formation of shared ideas about the self, society, and the economy, is undergoing dramatic shifts.

Tracking these shifts and their impacts in different parts of the world represents a significant opportunity for anthropologists to play a central role in answering some of the critical questions that will shape scholarship on bureaucratic organizations moving forward. These questions include: How does digitization of the bureaucratic exterior affect transparency and trust between organizations and their users? How do different technologies of contact—e.g. web portals, teleconferencing, long-distance learning, robo-advising, etc.—distribute, delimit, or eliminate discretion, power, and agency at the street-level? Which spaces of contact and modes of claim-making have been opened and closed by the burgeoning virtual presence of different organizations? How do digital documents and templates affect the abilities of users and bureaucracies to communicate with—and understand—one another? And how do varying mixes of virtual and physical bureaucratic experience impact the ways people understand the nature of the state, the corporation, the trade union, etc.?

This panel invites papers which engage any aspect of the virtual and/or automated relationship between individuals and bureaucratic organizations. If you are interested, please send a title and abstract of no more than 250 words to [email protected] by April 7, 2017. Selected panelists will be notified shortly thereafter.

Kelly McKowen
PhD Candidate, Anthropology
Princeton University
[email protected]

Call for papers: Famine in Africa

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

African Nations Confronting Famine 2017

Please consider the attached CFP and circulate to any person or group who may be interested.  I would also be delighted to have a volunteer as co-organizer/chair.

Please send expressions of interest and comments asap and no later than 31 March. Include the geographic area and topical issue(s) you would like to address. I want to have time to rewrite the abstract in light of participants’ interests.

Note that as a Roundtable contributor
•  you do not need to write an abstract,
•   you do need to register by 12 April—10 April would be better—at the AAA website with AAA dues paid or membership waiver (I know the final final date is 14 April but I am going to need those last days to make final organizational adjustments and to pull my hair out as AAA system falls over in final rush as usual.)
•  you will speak 5-10 minutes, then participate in discussion with audience and panel
•  your participation counts as your major role under the AAA 1 plus 1 rule

I am interested in bringing this unfolding tragedy to the attention of as wide an audience as possible, as well as probing the ways anthropology/-ists can make a difference here, so I invite comment and suggestion from everyone, whether or not you wish to be on the panel.

Many thanks,

Diane
Anthropology Program
School of Social & Cultural Studies
Victoria University
PO Box 600
Wellington 6140
NEW ZEALAND
[email protected]

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Update on AAA annual meeting

Dear ASAP Colleagues,

The deadline for submitting your 2017 AAA Session Proposals is coming up – Friday, April 14.

We are seeing good calls for proposals listed here.  We encourage you to consider ASAP as a reviewing section for the DC meetings, themed Anthropology Matters!   This year we are also at a venue and time when policy matters.

A few things you should consider:

Invited Status: We hope to have one or two Invited Sessions this year.  If you are interested in having your roundtable or paper session be considered as “Invited,” please contact me ([email protected]) in advance to let me know of your interest and a few words about how your panel contributes to the anthropology of policy.   An invited panel or roundtable should reflect the ASAP mission and be well conceived. Submit your proposal at the regular deadline. The ASAP Program Committee will consider these sessions along with the others during the review period.  For more information see the section on invited sessions: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2040

Guest Registration Program:  Do you have a non-anthropologist or an international participant on your panel?  ASAP has one “guest” we can request from AAA and we (ASAP)  must apply by March 31. Registration fees and membership are paid.  See information below on who qualifies for “guest registration.” Please notify me soon if you wish to apply for one of your participants ([email protected]) and provide this information:
o   First and last name. Affiliation email address. Mailing address. Country of residence
o   Abstract for the session in which s/he will participate.  Abstract for paper.
o   A short statement about why s/he should receive the award

Submit your panels early:  AAA is working with new online submission system and review software.  I encourage you to submit your electronic proposals early to avoid the last minute potential for problems.

We look forward to reviewing your proposals.  Please contact me if you have any questions.

Carol MacLennan
ASAP 2017 Program Chair
[email protected]

Call for papers: Ethnographies of commoning

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Urban Ethnographies of Commoning

This panel aims to bring into conversation ethnographic case studies on forms of urban living created through acts of commoning –spaces imagined and lived as urban commons, belonging to no one and everyone.

We aim to reflect upon urban inhabitants’ commoning practices that produce and reproduce life in the city for the sake of cultivating a new ethos to sustain livelihoods and affirm communal instincts beyond motivations of profit, competition, and wealth spared for individual well-being at the expense of others. We would like to explore everyday cultures of commoning that rely on alternative socio-spatial relations. It is our aim to take a close look at urban inhabitants’ quotidian practices, be they work, reproductive labor, or leisure and festivity, that make our spaces in common despite (and in the midst of) capitalist social relationships.

Everyday acts of commoning materialize within the cracks of the capitalist system and potentially create new life-forms. We treasure such practices of commoning, for they not only reveal urban inhabitants’ capacity to make the city but they also imply a radical will to remake ourselves and our lives by way of reorganizing our everyday lives, living spaces, redefining forms of production and labor, developing new means of livelihood, and in turn reminding us every day that we all inhabit a common life-world.

We would like to highlight both achievements and drawbacks. We dwell on the emancipatory potentials of commoning practices, as well as the incomplete or conflicting processes and incompatibilities they inhabit. We focus on cases of urban commoning while keeping an eye on their continuous enclosures.

What are some of the ways in which we can imagine and sustain our ongoing everyday lives as a locus of commoning? What kinds of sensibilities and perspectives (for instance a feminist perspective) can we incorporate into our understanding of urban commons?

This panel aims to discuss these questions by bringing together ethnographic case studies from different urban contexts, to discuss alternative forms of production, consumption, exchange, and sociality, all relying on practices of commoning as their major resource.

We are calling for empirically informed papers that offer refreshing perspectives on the following:

* Precarity and resistance
* Solidarity economies
* Commoning arts & culture in the city
* Commoning and law
* Commoning and affective labor in the city
* Experiences of commoning urban property
* Sustainable urban life

Please send abstracts (of 250 words) and bios (of 200 words) by April 3rd to Derya Özkan ([email protected]) and Güldem Baykal Büyüksaraç ([email protected]).

Call for papers: Measurement and markets

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Measurement and the Making of Markets

Organizers: Stephanie Friede (Duke University) and Georgia Hartman (UC Irvine)

This panel is concerned with the processes by which new objects of speculation come into being. Standardized systems of measurement allow goods to be abstracted from the social, political, and ecological contexts in which they are situated, rendering them legible to the market. The process of measurement–performed by well trained assessors, surveyors, economists, and other experts–is never as value-free as the graphs and maps they produce seem to suggest. We maintain that acts of quantification and measurement are but one way of thinking about spaces and places. From maps of atmospheric circulation that transform wind into an exchangeable commodity to the detailed processes for calculating land and home value, this panel will explore the culturally specific, contingent, and oft contested processes by which measurement and markets work to render new spaces and objects legible to investment. Papers will confront the following questions, among others:

· What methods, measurements, and calculative technologies are used to turn goods into exchangeable commodities?
· How does measurement constitute a way of knowing and how does it in turn shape understandings of and interactions in social and ecological environments?
· What is involved in making particular measurement methods accepted practice for marketizing specific kinds of goods?
· When expert ways of knowing and quantifying become accepted practice, what other ways of knowing are silenced in that process?

Please submit a paper title and abstract of no more than 250 words by April 3, 2017 to Stephanie Friede ([email protected]) and Georgia Hartman ([email protected]). Notifications will be sent no later than April 10th.

Please title the subject of your email, “Measurement Panel Submission.” Please email with any questions.

Call for papers: Refugees, policies, governments

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

The Effects of Recent Changes in National and International Governments and Policies on Refugee Experiences in Host Countries

Contact: Russell Manzano [email protected] and Kelly Yotebieng [email protected]

Governments in Europe and the United States have recently experienced intense political upheavals. The right-leaning and populist parties have been gaining strength, and fueling nationalist and xenophobic sentiments in many segments of society. The global refugee “crisis” is at the heart of these complex dynamics. It is imperative to examine these geopolitical changes anthropologically to understand how they affect refugees’ experiences in host countries and perpetuate cycles of harm. This panel seeks to examine how international and national regime shifts influence immigration policy, and how these changes in turn shape the experiences of refugees and migrants. Additionally, we will explore the interpretation of these recent policy shifts from the perspective of countries of origin (e.g., Rwanda) and host countries (e.g., Italy), and how these often competing or contradictory perspectives further complicate the implementation of international refugee law and policies. Further, since nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) contribute to and are often vital in the process of resettlement and integration of refugees, the ways in which these groups attempt to ameliorate the economic and social suffering of refugees in host countries is critical to deepening our understanding of how larger political changes affect these on-the-ground efforts.

Building on a robust anthropological literature that examines refugee policy, this panel seeks to expand refugee and migration analysis by considering the effects of rising nationalism in the context of abrupt political changes that occurred in 2016. This panel critically examines how political events, such as the British exit from the European Union, the European response to refugees, and the 2016 United States elections, have influenced immigration and refugee policy, both nationally and internationally. The increase of nationalism and xenophobia, particularly in the Global North, often creates concepts of “deservingness” of refugees based on their country of origin, religion, and ethnicity as shown by Holmes and Castañeda (2016). Thus, we question how the public perception of deservingness categorizes individuals as either refugees in need of humanitarian aid or dangerous migrants. Likewise, we also examine how increases in the number of migrants and refugees traveling to host countries affect public opinion and immigration policy. This panel seeks to understand critical questions relating to global political events and refugees. How does political change in host or home countries affect refugees’ protection under the Geneva Convention and international law? How does the increase in nationalism affect the public sentiments towards refugees and their perceived deservingness? How do regime and policy changes affect individual refugees, as well as refugee “diasporas” in general? Our session will explore the impact of current political events on refugee policy, public perception, and refugees’ experiences in both home and host countries. This panel will allow presenters to demonstrate how anthropological research can contribute to the understanding of immigration and refugee policy, and inform policy makers and NGOs to best assist refugees.

We invite abstracts from both academic and practicing anthropologists, as well as other disciplines, for papers that ethnographically explore these questions and problems.  Please submit an abstract (250 words max.) to the panel organizers by Friday, MARCH 31, for full consideration.

Call for papers: Celtic fringe

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Re-Examining Minority Nationalism: Renewing Anthropological
Interest in the Celtic Fringe 

While gaining increased attention in recent months, as the implications of Brexit begin to unfold, the ‘Celtic Fringe’ remains an under-studied region of Anthropological inquiry, due to a perceived Western-centricity.  Yet, the complexities of the nations that compose the Celtic Fringe, notably through the lens of nationalism and political pluralism, beg ongoing and intensive investigation.  Interestingly, the Celtic nations including Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Cornwall, Brittany, and the Isle of Man, as well as the uneasy fit of Northern Ireland in the preceding category, all present highly opportune and timely sites of research on any number of meaningful contemporary topics of study.  The political, social, linguistic, ideological, economic, and environmental landscapes within each of these nations, as well as considering these ‘minority nations’ as a whole relative to the more powerful and dominant national contexts in which they are situated, rival the complexity of said environments in more traditional locations of Anthropological investigation.  Accordingly, the intent of this panel is to highlight the current Anthropological research taking place in the Celtic Fringe.  We acknowledge that the term Celtic Fringe is a roughly ascribed and imprecise term, rather than completely representative or inclusively definitive of the nations referenced above.  With that said, we seek to unpack this under-studied category, and aim to include timely papers from researchers both within as well as outside the above listed nations, in order to fully harness both central Anthropological perspectives–the emic and etic, to provide highly relevant insight into this region of the world.

We are seeking papers, which align with the intent of our panel.  Please submit your proposed paper abstract by March 31, to Nory Kaplan-Kelly at [email protected] and Kimberly Berg at [email protected].
Accepted panels will be notified by April 7th, and will be expect to submit their respective abstract by April 14th.

Call for papers: After zika

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

After” Zika: Making Anthropology Matter in Zika Management and Long-Term Response
Zika has largely disappeared from the headlines, but its story has only just begun. The zika virus (ZIKV) continues to mobilize global health agendas, galvanize international scientific research, and deeply impact the lives of affected women, men, children. From late 2015 when its possible connection to microcephaly in Brazil became international news, ZIKV and its reproductive consequences have been a public health nightmare for affected countries. It has also highlighted longstanding social inequalities that expose some populations to arboviruses and their dangers more than others, such as lack of basic sanitation, inadequate living and working conditions, and differential access to healthcare. The many uncertainties surrounding the disease itself, combined with economic and political turmoil affecting the hardest hit nations, have contributed to slow and/or insufficient policy response. The virus’s spread throughout the Americas and beyond thus raises important questions for anthropology: How does the continuing threat of zika virus infection affect women’s and men’s reproductive decision-making? How is knowledge (scientific and otherwise) about emerging epidemics like zika produced, circulated, and solidified, and to what effects? In what ways are social inequalities (involving race, gender, class, geographic location, physical ability, and others) highlighted and exacerbated by zika and its reproductive consequences?

This panel will present research that proposes a continuing role for anthropological research in the long-term management of ZIKV in the Americas and beyond.

We invite submissions that address the challenges of the ongoing zika crisis, including, but not limited to:

  • Critical analyses of how the ZIKV epidemic has mobilized particular global health agendas, as well as presented challenges to global health governance;
  • The production of scientific knowledge on ZIKV and the impact of this knowledge on public policies to address the outbreak;
  • Reconfigurations of knowledge practices in science and policy evidenced by the response to zika and its effects;
  • Temporalities of disease spread, scientific research, and policy response in public health emergencies;
  • How the concept of risk is encoded in public discourse on zika and its reproductive consequences;
  • Reproductive decision-making in the face of the zika epidemic;
  • Everyday care of children affected by congenital zika syndrome;
  • Anthropology’s role in confronting zika and its aftermath.

Please send us your 250 word abstract by April 6. We will notify presenters by April 8th. Contact Lucia Guerra-Reyes at [email protected] or Eliza Williamson at [email protected]

ASAP monthly update – March 2017

Notable this past month

1. Insight on trade policy shows up in the Tijuana micro-brew industry — see our Instagram feed at www.instagram.com/anthofpolicy

2. The latest ASAP column is now available on Anthropology News Online — the link is here

Presidential Elections in Austria and Rise of the Far Right

By Cansu Civilek (University of Vienna)

Reviews the Austrian presidential election with emphasis on the mixed views of Turkish immigrants on the right-wing, anti-immigrant candidate.

Moreover, [right-wing candidate] Hofer’s religious references seem to be paying off. People find him to be a believer who fears God, which makes him a more honest candidate. A business owner said, ‘Hofer takes God beside him, like Erdoğan.’”

“It appears that the easier answer for some citizens with migration backgrounds has been to disregard their own past struggles, and submit to strong leaders and their policies of socioeconomic ‘stabilization and strength.’”3. You can always access ASAP AN columns on the “ASAP Forum” tab on our web page: anthofpolicy.org

Coming up

Planning goes forward for sessions at the AAA meetings in Washington, D.C. this November. Calls for papers are appearing in force on the listserv and you can also find them on our web page.

As always you can find us . . .

. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: [email protected]
Ted Powers and Judi Pajo regarding the ASAP column in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]