ASAP monthly update: March 2018

Notable recently

The annual review of ASAP activities by the co-presidents has just been published in Anthropology News online. The link is
http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2018/03/09/notes-from-the-section-leadership/.
Cris and David review what ASAP has been doing and how it has been growing as an AAA section, but also conclude that:

. . . we are also thinking beyond the AAA. Our aim is to stimulate broader dialogue between anthropology and other disciplines including political science, sociology, organizational studies, and law, as well as between the academic world and that of government officials and policy professionals. The makings, workings, and effects of public policy continue to be central to how the world works—and how it must work better in the future. These are just some of the reasons why policy is, and will continue to be, a key field for anthropological research, analysis, and practice.

Coming up

ASAP has now issued the call for submissions for our annual graduate student paper prize. The deadline is June 15, 2018, and the details are on the ASAP web site at http://asap.americananthro.org/asap-graduate-paper-prize-2/

To complement the just-published annual review by the co-presidents, there will be a longer review of ASAP sessions at the Washington, D.C. published in Anthropology News within the next few weeks. It is written by the ASAP co-presidents-elect, Carol MacLennan and Paul Stubbs.

Remember that the listserv and web are available to announce potential sessions for the AAA meeting in San Jose, or for any other conferences that may be relevant to the anthropology of policy. Send those to Eric Cheng, the listserv coordinator, at [email protected]. These calls for papers are also posted on the website at www.anthofpolicy.org if you want to review them. At the moment, we have calls there for EASA and IUAES as well as for the AAA.

A previous call for essays on migration and immigration by the Committee on Refugees and Immigrants is still open. This is a useful short format essay that is intended to make anthropological findings and perspectives more accessible to non-specialists. It is, however, a fully refereed process. See the call at http://asap.americananthro.org/call-for-papers-migration-and-borders/

As always you can find us . . .
. . . on the web at www.anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy