ASAP monthly update — September 2017

Notable recently

The latest ASAP column for Anthropology News has just been published: “In the Loop and Off the Record” by Negar Razavi. It is a condensed version of last year’s ASAP graduate student paper prize.

http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/09/19/in-the-loop-and-off-the-record

Coming up

The next Instagram guest contributor will be Eric Cheng. If you miss the daily posts, you can still find the full set at @anthofpolicy. Note that we are always glad to add additional Instagram guest editors — basically an arrangement to do a series of six to eight photos and captions over about a two week period. If you are interested, please contact Georgia Hartman at: [email protected]

ASAP will have the following four invited sessions for the AAA meetings in Washington this fall:

(1) Medical Anthropology in the Trump Era, co-sponsored with the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA)
(2) The Effects of Recent Changes in National and International Governments on Refugee Experiences in Host Countries, co-sponsored with the Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology (SUNTA)
(3) Beyond Snowden: The Anthropology of Whistleblowing, co-sponsored with the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology (APLA)
(4) Intersections of Truth and Violence, also co-sponsored with APLA

More detail on these and our other sessions will be circulated on the this list, with additional material on Facebook, beginning about October 1.

ASAP’s work with SUNTA on refugees continues. A collection of about twenty essays on maintaining refuge is in final production for both web and print. Expected publication is October or November.

As always you can find us . . .

. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: [email protected]
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers regarding the ASAP column in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: jasonbar[email protected]

Book announcements

Below are several new member publications. If you have other publication announcements, please send them to Eric Cheng, ASAP’s listserv manager, at [email protected]


My new book titled Managing Ambiguity. How Clientelism, Citizenship, and Power Shape Personhood in Bosnia and Herzegovina was published by Berghahn Books in 2017.

More information can be found here:
http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title/BrkovicManaging/#

With best wishes,
Carna

Carna Brkovic
[email protected]


Wanting to pass along this book announcement to the ASAP listserv:

Lions of the North: Sounds of the New Nordic Radical Nationalism. https://www.amazon.com/Lions-North-Sounds-Radical-Nationalism/dp/0190212608

Thanks!

Benjamin R. Teitelbaum
[email protected]


Since we are trying to encourage more book announcements from ASAP members, I will toss in my contribution too. The following two books, both designed as course texts, will be out in August (intro to anth) and October (intro to US immigration). Both have decent pre-publication discounts.

An Introduction to Sociocultural Anthropology: Adaptations, Structures, Meanings (2nd ed.). 20 percent off list price of $34.95 with coupon code HAIN17 at http://upcolorado.com/university-press-of-colorado/item/3192-an-introduction-to-sociocultural-anthropology

Immigration Structures and Immigrant Lives: An Introduction to the U.S. Experience. 25 percent off list price of $36.00  with coupon code RLFANDF25 at https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442260115

Best regards,
David

David Haines, ASAP co-president
[email protected]

ASAP update — Summer 2017

Notable recently

The latest print edition of Anthropology News includes section-by-section essays. For ASAP, Judi Pajo and Ted Powers pulled together some thoughts on ASAP’s goals and hopes, mostly from current officers. Take a look and think if we are moving on course or need adjustments.

For those of you who have been following our joint focus with SUNTA on refuge in troubled times, a series of essays has now appeared as an In Focus segment in Anthropology News at:

http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/category/in-focus/maintaining-refuge/

ASAP and SUNTA are also working on publishing two other sets of essays on maintaining refuge, one as a second In Focus segment in Anthropology News and another as a free-standing print/web publication. Our two sections will also have several sessions on refugees and other migrants at the AAA meeting in DC.

Coming up

If you are in the field this summer and would like to be a guest editor for our Instagram process, please contact Georgia Hartman at: [email protected]

In Fall, we will begin a series of focus segments on social media, highlighting some of the sessions coming up at the Washington meetings. We will let you know when those begin.

Our next Anthropology News column will be Negar Razavi’s “In the Loop and Off the Record: Power and the Washington Establishment” — an abridged version of last year’s ASAP Best Graduate Paper.

As always you can find us . . .

. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: [email protected]
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers regarding the ASAP column in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]

Miscellaneous opportunities


The Department of Social Sciences at Michigan Technological University invites applications for an Assistant Professor in Environmental Policy to join an interdisciplinary social sciences faculty.

Possible research interests include climate policy, energy policy, environmental policy, environmental health policy, or natural resource policy. Candidates with strengths in international policy and spatial approaches, including GIS, are especially encouraged to apply.

For more information please visit: https://www.jobs.mtu.edu/postings/5791


Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC), is now recruiting for the tenured position of Anthropologist particularly who are working on the field of peace and education development.

For more information please visit:
https://www.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/system/files/81435/20170622_idec_kilyouikubunka_eng.pdf


The Negotiating Agreement in Congress Research Grants are aimed at scholars who seek to understand the conditions under which political negotiation can be achieved (or not achieved) in Congress and other legislative arenas. The grants provide up to $10,000 of funding for each awardee, to be used for up to one year of research and writing. Applicants must have a PhD in hand by the application deadline and must hold an affiliation with a college or university based in the United States.

For more information, please visit www.ssrc.org/nacg or contact us at [email protected].

APLA graduate student paper prize

The APLA Board invites individuals who are students in a graduate degree-granting program (including M.A., Ph.D., J.D., LL.M., S.J.D. etc.) to send stand-alone papers centering on the analysis of political and/or legal institutions and processes.
Topics may include citizenship; colonialism and post-colonial public spheres; cosmopolitanism; cultural politics; disability; environment; globalization; governance; humanitarianism; medicine, science, and technology; multiculturalism; nationalism; NGOs and civil society; new media; immigration and refugees; race and racial oppression; resistance; religious institutions; security, policing, or militarism; sexualities; social movements; human and civil rights; sovereignty; war and conflict.  We encourage submissions that expand the purview of political and legal anthropology and challenge us to think in new ways about power, politics and law.The committee will select five finalists; each finalist will be assigned a mentor who shares substantive interests to offer feedback. APLA awards a cash prize of $350.00, plus travel expenses of up to $650.00 if the prize winner attends the 2017 annual meetings of the American Anthropological Association (Washington DC) to receive the prize in person. The prize winner will be announced in Anthropology News, and the winning paper will be considered for publication in the peer-reviewed journal of the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology, PoLAR: The Political and Legal Anthropology Review.

Authors must be enrolled in a graduate program through at least May 1, 2017. Papers should not exceed 8,000 words (including notes and references) and should follow the style guidelines of PoLAR, which are detailed in the American Anthropological Association Style Guide. Please review the submission instructions carefully, as they have been revised.

Submission Instructions

Please submit papers to [email protected] by July 1, 2017. To facilitate a blind review process, please send two, separate .pdf files according to the following specifications:

1) A title page with your name, paper title, and contact information.
2) The paper manuscript itself, devoid of personal identifiers, but with title in the header of each page.

APLA Graduate Student Paper Prize Committee:
Jennifer Curtis, chair
Kate Sullivan
Erik Harms
Mindie Lazarus-Black

ASAP monthly update – April 2017

Notable this past month

ASAP has added a new category of sustaining membership at $25. Consider that when you renew — it will help us expand our efforts on behalf of students.Note that the basic dues structure remains the same: $10 for regular members and $5 for students.

The number of our Facebook followers is closing in on 400. That is good progress — and thanks to Jason Scott.

Remember you can always access ASAP AN columns on the “ASAP Forum” tab on our web page: anthofpolicy.org

Coming up

The program for the AAA in Washington is looking good, although the online submission process has been exceedingly difficult and the deadline has been postponed until Tuesday, April 18. Note that one highlight in Washington will be a second mentorship-directed ASAP session. Details will follow later on.

The ASAP column in the forthcoming print version of Anthropology News features personal comments from ASAP members about how they see the anthropology of policy. Thanks to Judi Pajo and Ted Powers for setting this up.

The month’s Instagram guest contributor is James M. Hundley (May 1-15). James is a sociocultural anthropologist at Binghamton University in New York who works in the borderlands of the Pacific Northwest. His research explores the ways in which the Coast Salish First Nations are overcoming the obstacles presented by increased security pressures at the international border in the 21st century. Follow him at @anthofpolicy May 1-15 to see how a cultural revitalization project of canoe families from around the region paddle for days or weeks to a host community, and explore environmental protests that have united indigenous and non-native allies to reject oil pipeline and coal projects in the region.

The joint efforts on refugee issues between ASAP and SUNTA (Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology) continue. An “In Focus” set of essays will appear in Anthropology News in about a month and a stand-alone volume is scheduled to be out in September. Note that similar cooperative efforts with other AAA sections on other selected topics might be extremely useful.

As always you can find us . . .
. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: [email protected]
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers regarding the ASAP column in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]

New ASAP sustaining membership option

Our interim Treasurer Rebecca Peters notes there is now an option to be a sustaining member of ASAP for $25. When you renew your AAA membership, please consider making this small donation to our association as it will help us grow our resource base more quickly. We are now able to offer the graduate student essay prize, for instance, and look forward to funding more activities for our members as we are able.

Otherwise our ASAP dues structure remains the same: $10 for regular members and $5 for students.

Call for papers: Seizures of power (Brazil and Turkey)

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Golpe/ Darbe: Seizures of Power in Brazil and Turkey

There are many parallels to be drawn between the 2016 impeachment in Brazil and the 2017 coup attempt in Turkey. This panel invites scholars working on Latin America and the Middle East to engage in what we hope to be an ongoing conversation about the theoretical, methodological, and political dilemmas we face when we look at golpe and darbe together as grounded experiences of power.

What do these two political events imply for discourses of democratization and transitional justice in Brazil, Turkey, and beyond? In what ways are they becoming another past to reckon with, with whose voices? What are the implications of these large-scale political processes on writing histories and ethnographies?

The intricate histories of state–society relations and political economy in both Brazil and Turkey will provide rich grounds for a productive discussion, on issues such as: corruption, constitutionalism, populism, state legitimacy, citizenship, accountability, the ruling elite, lawfare, “legal coup”, revenge/ purge, economic violence, scales of justice, the role of the media, technologies of truth and evidence.

Please send abstracts (max. 250 words) with titles and keywords to the organizer Hande Sarikuzu ([email protected]) by April 11, 2017. Participants will be notified by April 12, 2017. Please note that all participants must be registered to attend the AAA Annual Meeting by 5:00 pm on Friday, April 14 to appear in the program.

Call for papers: Teaching interventions

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Empathy Matters: Teaching Interventions in a Time of Intensive Inequality and Division

Organizers:
Madelaine Adelman, Justice & Social Inquiry, Arizona State University, [email protected]
Nora Haenn, Anthropology and International Studies, North Carolina State University, [email protected]

Call for Five (5) Presenters on Proposed Roundtable:

If interested, please send us your name, email address, institutional affiliation, issue or subject matter, name of course and degree program or educational context, and brief description of your approach to social empathy. We aim to create a diverse roundtable per the outline below. Note that “presenter” counts as a “major role” for individual participation at AAA meeting.

This roundtable focuses on the pragmatics of teaching empathy during a period of heightened politicization of difference. Inspired by social work scholar Elizabeth Segal’s notion of “social empathy,” this roundtable brings together participants who seek to cultivate and reinforce empathy as a skill required of an informed and educated, politically-engaged public. Segal distinguishes between “interpersonal empathy” and “social empathy.” Interpersonal empathy comprises two main components: 1) the affective physiological response to another’s experience; and 2) the cognitive mental processing where one distinguishes between self and other while taking into account another person’s perspective (Gerdes & Segal, 2009, p. 120, Segal, 2013). According to Segal, social empathy is “the ability to understand people by perceiving or experiencing their life situations and as a result gain insight into structural inequalities and disparities” (Segal, 2007, 2011, 2013). Social empathy builds on interpersonal empathy by recognizing the conditions that create inequalities, and by imagining what it is like to be part of another group. Humans are more likely to identify with and consider deserving of assistance those who “look like us.” Thus, cultivating social empathy includes exposure, explanation and experience to difference across human history, culture, and lifespan. Because social empathy includes an understanding of structural inequalities, students trained in social empathy may better identify steps toward social change and more effectively shape public policy, social movements, or other pathways to justice (Segal, 2013).

In order to explore how educators have addressed social empathy in the classroom, as well as ideas resonant with the more formal framework, this roundtable brings together participants whose work on various identity differences (e.g. race, migration status, gender and sexuality, party affiliation, Israel/Palestine, etc.) has taken on amplified meaning in today’s political atmosphere. As teachers, how do we effectively teach social empathy in our diverse academic settings and across different levels of student engagement? How do we do so in light of the specific political concerns surrounding particular identity formations and our students’ positions within those formations? Participants will explain their rationale for incorporating empathy, either implicitly or explicitly in the classroom, and reflect on and assess novel as well as time-tested pedagogical approaches to empathy as either a teaching tool (i.e. a means to reach a related but unique outcome) or as a goal (i.e. the intended outcome itself).  Overall, the roundtable aims to reinforce the ways we, as educators, can help students move beyond feeling and understanding to action based on a sense of social responsibility (Segal, 2011, p. 268).

Gerdes, K. & Segal, E.A. (2009). A Social Work Model of Empathy. Advances in Social Work, 10, 2, pp. 114-127.

Segal, E.A. (2013). Social Empathy: Using Interpersonal Skills to Effect Change, 25th National Symposium on Doctoral Research in Social Work, Invited Keynote Speaker, Ohio State University College of Social Work, Columbus, OH.

Segal, E.A. (2011) Social Empathy: A Model Built on Empathy, Contextual Understanding, and Social Responsibility That Promotes Social Justice. Journal of Social Service Research, 37, 3, pp. 266-277.

Segal, E.A. (2007). Social empathy: A new paradigm to address poverty. Journal of Poverty: Innovations on Social, Political, & Economic Inequalities, 11, 3, pp. 65–81.