ASAP monthly update: September 2108

Recently

ASAP has reviewed and selected the winner of the annual graduate paper prize. The submissions were strong this year, and the committee also decided to award an honorable mention. The award presentation will be at the annual ASAP business meeting in San Jose.

Coming up

More information will be coming up on the AAA meetings in San Jose. But do note that the ASAP business meeting will be on Friday,  from 7:45 – 9:15 in the evening. The time is definitely not of our choosing — but come anyway! If you have any items you would like discussed, send them to Co-President David Haines at [email protected] .

ASAP will soon be starting our version of the “I am AAA” series. They will appear occasionally on Instagram and Facebook, and the whole set eventually will go to the listserv and web. If you see anything that encourages you to also do one of these, contact Georgia Hartman at [email protected]

The next ASAP column in Anthropology News will be a general assessment of the anthropology of policy and how it is evolving, written by Ted Powers, one of our column editors. Also note that we are glad to discuss possible ASAP columns with any of you. Just contact Ted and our other editor Judi Pajo. Their email addresses are [email protected] and [email protected]

As always you can find us . . .

. . . on the web at www.anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts
– Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
– David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
– Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
– Judi Pajo and Ted Powers for ASAP columns in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
– Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]
– Paul Stubbs for the ASAP program at the 2018 AAA in San Jose: [email protected]

Call for papers: Contested sovereignties

CFP: International Europeanists Conference
Sovereignties in Contention: Nations, Regions, and Citizens in Europe

June 20-22, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Spain
The European Culture Research Network [ECRN] of The Council for European Studies

https://councilforeuropeanstudies.org/conferences/upcoming-conferences/2019-conference

Panel Organizers & Chairs:
Brenna McCaffrey, PhD Student, Cultural Anthropology, CUNY Graduate Center
Joanna Mishtal, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Central Florida

Panel Title: “Contested Sovereignty and Reproductive Governance in Europe”

Panel Abstract:

In keeping with the conference focus on shifting forms of sovereignty, this panel focuses on the contested domain of reproductive politics as a form of governance that engages with issues such as population, nation, citizens, race/ethnicity, care, and reproduction. The concept of reproductive governance refers to “the mechanisms through which different historical configurations of actors – such as state, religious, and international financial institutions, NGOs, and social movements – use legislative controls, economic inducements, moral injunctions, direct coercion, and ethical incitements to produce, monitor, and control reproductive behaviours and population practices” (Roberts and Morgan 2012:241). Examining changing laws, biomedical practices, activist strategies, pharmaceutical licensing, and public discourses around reproductive healthcare can help illuminate co-occuring shifts in the logics of sovereignty within the European Union and European nation-states. At the same time, feminist arguments for increased bodily autonomy and human rights claims have come into conflict with healthcare systems and legal regimes governing abortion and areas of family planning. The role of the Church is also in flux, controlling certain moral arguments and legitimating conscientious objection clauses in medicine, while declining in moral and political influence as an institution in other contexts. Crucially, reproductive practices in Europe today often resists national boundaries, and thereby defy the sovereignty of national policies. This is especially evident in abortion care, as people are increasingly either travelling across borders to seek services, or sending the abortion pill across borders, to get around barriers to access such as waiting periods and a lack of health providers. This panel will take up the lens of reproductive governance to analyze how reproductive politics are an integral part of contesting and making boundaries and sovereignty in Europe today.

This panel will consist of 5 paper presentations, and comments provided by a Chair and a Discussant. We invite abstract submission for papers from across disciplines and European regions which examine questions of governance and sovereignty in the context of reproductive policies, politics, practices, experiences, or discourses. Papers may be single country studies, comparative, or transnational.

Deadlines & Abstract Submission:

Abstract submissions due to session organizers by: September 26, 2018.
Abstract selection completed and email notifications sent to authors by September 30, 2018.
Session submission (completed by organizers) by October 5, 2018.

Please submit a 250-word abstract and paper title along with your name, title, institutional affiliation, rank, and e-mail address for all presenting and non-presenting authors to [email protected] and [email protected].

Note: You do not have to become a CES member in order to submit an abstract or participate in CES conference, once the session is accepted.  However, CES members pay a discounted rate for Conference registration, which is required of all paper presenters. Please see CES website for more information about the conference: https://councilforeuropeanstudies.org/conferences/upcoming-conferences/2019-conference

ASAP monthly update: July 2018

Notable recently

Cansu Civelek, ASAP’s grad student representative is in Brazil for the IUAES meeting. She is doing occasional reports for ASAP. See us on Facebook and Instagram.

The latest ASAP column appears on line as well as in the summer print edition of Anthropology News. It is as follows:

Forecasting Policy Trends
By Kristina Hook
Originally: Anthropology News Online (July 13, 2018)
Temporary link is here

Describes opportunities for anthropologists “to inject a human-focused approach” in the area of predictive technologies for public policy questions.

“Future prognostications tend to baffle each successive generation, as familiar technologies and approaches branch off in surprising directions. Predicting the future of anthropological policy studies, including its makings, workings, contexts, agents, and effects, is thus akin to tracing an individual wave during a tsunami.”

“To effectively engage a policy process, we must aim to make our contributions actionable—not just interesting. To do so, while remaining true to our strengths of nuance and complexity, integrated anthropological approaches across our field’s subfields promise sophisticated methodologies for incorporating gradation—a toolkit that is useful even to big data evangelists.”

Coming up

For those of you who may be going to the EASA meeting in Stockholm this summer, Cris Shore and Susan Wright will have a panel on “The Anthropology of Policy Revisited.” See the program for details on place and time: https://www.easaonline.org/conferences/easa2018/

Georgia Hartman welcomes additional series of Instagram posts, especially on summer field projects. Contact her at [email protected]

As always you can find us . . .
. . . on the web at www.anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts
Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]

David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers for ASAP columns in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]
Paul Stubbs for the ASAP program at the 2018 AAA in San Jose: [email protected]

Grad paper prize deadline extended to July 10

ASAP graduate paper prize — extended deadline

The Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) invites submissions for its 2018 Graduate Paper Prize. The prize is awarded annually for the best graduate student paper on any aspect of the anthropology of policy. A condensed version of the winning paper will be published in the ASAP Anthropology News column and linked on the ASAP website. There is also a $250 cash award.

Your paper should be based upon substantial and original research. We are particularly interested in originality, depth of research, and contribution to the field. Review criteria will include the paper’s organization, the clarity of writing, and the broader implications of the paper’s topic in terms of the makings, workings, and effects of policy. Papers should directly address the anthropology of policy rather than merely being about policy per se.

Manuscripts should be sent to Jennifer Hubbert ([email protected]) by July 10, 2018.

General eligibility criteria:

Students must be in a degree-granting program (including MA or PhD) at the time of their submission. Paper must be the original work of the student, previously unpublished, and written within the past two years. The author must be in a degree-granting program (either MA or PhD) at the time of submission or when the paper was finalized.

Manuscript format criteria:

Submit the manuscript in an MS Word file with an absolute maximum of 7,000 words, including all notes and references. Use standard anthropological format for citations, end notes, and references cited. Include a title and abstract of 250 words.

Also submit an MS Word cover sheet with your name, mailing address, e-mail address, telephone number, university affiliation, and academic status (MA or PhD). Make sure your  name is included only on the cover sheet, so that we can ensure there is blind review.

ASAP monthly update: April 2018

Notable recently

With final submissions to the AAA this week, our program for the meeting in San Jose is shaping up. In particular, there will again be two mentoring sessions: one is the matching of senior members with graduate students and new professionals for informal general discussion; the other will be a joint effort with CAE (Council on Anthropology and Education) on specifically education-related policy issues. We again received a small grant from the AAA to help on these.

Note that election material is now online on the AAA web site. ASAP is continuing its pattern of having co-presidents, one U.S. based and one from elsewhere. When you vote for co-president, vote for two candidates. The officer-at-large position is a regular “choose one candidate” election.

Also we seem to be coming up in the world. We received our first real scam attempt to have us divert money. The phishing community must have run out of low-hanging fruit or otherwise fallen on hard times. We chose not to come to their aid.

Coming up

Remember the call for submissions for our annual graduate student paper prize. The deadline is June 15, 2018, and the details are on the ASAP web site at http://asap.americananthro.org/asap-graduate-paper-prize-2/

As always you can find us . . .
. . . on the web at www.anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts
Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers for ASAP columns in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]
Paul Stubbs for the ASAP program at the 2018 AAA in San Jose: [email protected]

Call for papers (AAA): Policy and politics in exceptional times

Call for Papers, AAA San Jose, CA
States of Exception:  Policy and Politics in Exceptional Times

Deadline:  10.04.2018

Organizers: Cansu Civelek (University of Vienna); Dr. Cris Shore (University of Auckland)
Discussant: Dr. Ayşe Çağlar (University of Vienna)

Abstract

In recent decades, particularly since 9/11, anthropologists, social scientists, and legal studies scholars have become increasingly interested in the theme of governing in and through emergencies, often drawing on Georgio Agamben’s (2005) and Carl Schmitt’s notion of “state of exception”. What these studies share is a concern with scrutinizing sovereign power by investigating state interventions into the rule of law, restrictions on jurisdiction, suspension of human and citizenship rights, militarization, surveillance, and constitutional dictatorships emerging from declarations of state of exception. In addition to formal declarations of exception, however, neoliberal policy agendas, the crisis of democracy, and the proliferation of declarations of urgency and emergency suggest that in many places the “state of emergency” has become the new normal. Whether it be environmental catastrophes, wars, economic crises, or political unrest, governments, public-sector institutions, private bodies and not-for-profit organizations all utilize crises and emergencies to justify making ‘exceptional’ interventions into the domains of policy and law. In some contexts, ruling by decrees has become a governing practice that has blurred the relationship between policy-making, laws, and the concept of due process. What contribution can anthropology of policy make to understanding these processes and challenges? This panel aims to address this theme in all its dimensions.

We welcome empirical and conceptual papers (max. 250 words), including ethnographic and historical investigations, that explore states of exception from anthropological perspectives, or that trace intersections of emergency, risk, threats, and crises that foster policy change in different policy arenas (labor policy, urban policy, security and defense, local economy, social policy etc). We invite contributions that unravel the way policy interventions under states of emergency provide opportunities for the accumulation of wealth and power on the one hand, and dispossession, marginalization, and exclusion on the other. Topics may address, but are not limited to, any of the following questions:

–  What are the characteristics of governing in and through emergencies?
–  What political and economic interests do emergencies serve?
–  What do states of exception tell us about legal norms or ‘states of normality’?
–  What informal as well as formal practices of governance are associated with emergencies?
–  What new kinds of subjects and relation do states of exception create?
–  How do people engage with, or respond to, such states of emergency?

Deadline for abstract submissions: 10th of April

For submissions (max. 250 words) and questions please email to [email protected] and [email protected] which would include affiliation and contact details.

* New Publication*
Cansu Civelek (2017) Social Housing, Urban Renewal and Shifting Meanings of ‘Welfare State’ in Turkey: A Study of the Karapınar Renewal Project, EskiŞehir, in Paul Watt, Peer Smets (ed.) Social Housing and Urban Renewal, pp.391 – 429.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/full/10.1108/978-1-78714-124-720171011

Cansu Civelek

PhD Candidate
Uni: DOCs Fellow
Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology
University of Vienna
Tel: +43 (0)1 427749545
Universitätsstraße 7, 4th Floor
A-1010 Vienna

Call for papers (AAA): Possibilities of care

Dear colleagues,

We are seeking abstract submissions for the following proposed panel at the 2018 AAA meeting in San Jose, CA. Please submit an abstract of no more than 250 words to Fayana Richards ([email protected]) and Gabriela Morales ([email protected]) by April 3, 2018.

Possibilities of Care: Social and Political Enactments of the Good Life
Organizers: Fayana Richards (University of Massachusetts, Amherst) and Gabriela Morales (Scripps College)
Discussant: Felicity Aulino (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)

What does it mean to strive for a “good life” through the practice of care? How might the social relations involved in care enact particular aspirational, moral, and political projects? This panel places the study of care in conversation with recent calls in anthropology to move past the discipline’s reliance on narratives of suffering and attend to how people enact “the good” (Chua 2014; Ortner 2016; Robbins 2013; Fischer 2014; Singh 2015). We build on Cheryl Mattingly’s argument that “the good life for humans is not merely about surviving but also about flourishing” (2014: 9) — and see care as central to intertwined questions of morality and well-being. We find that care creates productive possibilities and challenges what the good life looks like for individuals, including in contexts of precarity.

This panel considers diverse ways that people consider life to be “good,” “qualified,” or “ethical” — and how people enact (or at lease aspire to) these forms of life through acts and structures of care. We are especially interested in submissions that examine alternative understandings of “the good” as people live with, resist, or refuse hegemonic forces. Recent attention to morality in anthropology (Das 2007; Fassin 2012; Keane 2015; Lambek 2010; Zigon and Throop 2014) has raised productive questions about people engage with “the good” in ordinary practice. Building on these approaches, we consider how care enacts specific ideas about life for oneself and for others. We understand social ideas of “the good” to have complex implications for care; they may serve as the basis for forms of violence and domination (Mulla 2014; Stevenson 2014) but also potentially emerge as sites for generating new forms of living in precarious circumstances (Han 2012; Mattingly 2010; 2014). Yet even as we foreground “the good,” we seek to move beyond the idea that care necessarily arises from internal conviction and ask what other social configurations might shape the work of care (Aulino 2016). We ultimately consider whether certain relations of care might create possibilities for other kinds of life and other kinds of politics.

We invite submissions that consider how paradigms and practices of care enact moral and aspirational projects. Potential areas of inquiry include (but are not limited to):
How do social understandings of the moral good and/or well-being shape practices of care?
How does care enact forms of self-fashioning, becoming, and/or relating to others (cf. Mattingly 2014)?
How does care reflect the desire for a particular kind of life — or, potentially, a particular kind of death (cf. Desjarlais 2016; Garcia 2010; Stevenson 2014)?
Whose care, or what forms of caring, is socially valued or devalued (cf. Glenn 2010)?
How does caring for others articulate efforts to enact, live with, resist, or refuse conditions of oppression?
How might care be a site of anti-politics (Ticktin 2011) or, alternatively, for creating new political possibilities (e.g. Black Lives Matter, #MeToo movement)?

References:
Aulino, F. (2016). Rituals of care for the elderly in northern Thailand: Merit, morality, and the everyday of long‐term care. American Ethnologist, 43(1), 91-102.
Chua, J. L. (2014). In pursuit of the good life: aspiration and suicide in globalizing south India. Univ of California Press.
Das, V. (2007). Life and Words: Violence and the Descent into the Ordinary. Univ of California Press.
Desjarlais, R. (2016). Subject to death: Life and Loss in a Buddhist world. University of Chicago Press.
Fassin, D.  (Ed.). (2012). A companion to moral anthropology. John Wiley & Sons.
Fischer, E. F. (2014). The good life: aspiration, dignity, and the anthropology of wellbeing. Stanford University Press.
Garcia, A. (2010). The pastoral clinic: Addiction and dispossession along the Rio Grande. Univ of California Press.
Glenn, E. N. (2010). Forced to care: Coercion and caregiving in America. Harvard University Press.
Keane, W. (2015). Ethical life: Its natural and social histories. Princeton University Press.
Lambek, M. (Ed.). (2010). Ordinary ethics: Anthropology, language, and action. Fordham Univ Press.
Mattingly, C. (2010). The paradox of hope: Journeys through a clinical borderland. Univ of California Press.
—- (2014). Moral laboratories: Family peril and the struggle for a good life. Univ of California Press.
Mulla, S. (2014). The violence of care: Rape victims, forensic nurses, and sexual assault intervention. NYU Press.
Ortner, S. B. (2016). Dark anthropology and its others: Theory since the eighties. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, 6(1), 47-73.
Robbins, J. (2013). Beyond the suffering subject: toward an anthropology of the good. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 19(3), 447-462.
Singh, B. (2015). Poverty and the quest for life: Spiritual and material striving in rural India. University of Chicago Press.
Stevenson, L. (2014). Life beside itself: Imagining care in the Canadian Arctic. Univ of California Press.
Ticktin, M. I. (2011). Casualties of care: immigration and the politics of humanitarianism in France. Univ of California Press.
Zigon, J., & Throop, C. J. (2014). Moral experience: introduction. Ethos, 42(1), 1-15.
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Call for papers (EASA): Anthropologies of the state

Anthropologies of the State: Critical Interventions, New Directions

Roundtable for EASA 2018, 14-17 August, Stockholm

Organizers
Steffen Jensen (Aalborg University, Copenhagen)
Morten Koch Andersen (Dignity Institute, Denmark)
Anouk de Koning (Radboud University, Nijmegen)

This roundtable aims to explore future directions in the anthropology of the state. What new directions are emergent and what interventions are necessary in anthropological engagements with the state?
Over the past decades, anthropology has offered its ethnographically informed perspective on the state. It has questioned the nature and effects of the State Idea and sovereignty, examining how individuals and institutions come to stand in for that entity and with what effects. Anthropologists have also examined the state’s disciplinary operation and the way subject populations have engaged with such disciplinary mechanisms. While the state has often appeared as inherently repressive, recently, several anthropologists have called for an understanding of policy practice and bureaucracy in terms of the state’s utopian aspirations to produce the public good, and have drawn attention to the moral and affective dimensions of people’s engagement with the state. Yet other anthropologists have examined governmental assemblages that include a range of actors, from active citizens to corporations, and have asked what forms of citizenship emerge as a result. And how does mobility impact various forms of statecraft? What relations do states develop with populations in flux?
This roundtable invites scholars to reflect on the state of the art in anthropological engagements with the state. What kind of cases and foci have been central to that state of the art, and which have been absent? What kind of interventions may help push the field further?

You can propose a contribution to this roundtable through the EASA website by April 9 at the latest (see link below). Since this is a roundtable, we are looking for proposals for interventions, rather than full ethnographic papers. Each speaker will have some time to introduce their intervention, but most of the session will be reserved for discussion. Participation in an EASA roundtable counts as taking up a discussant role, and can be done alongside a paper presentation.

https://nomadit.co.uk/easa/easa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6611


Anouk de Koning | Department of Anthropology and Development Studies | Radboud University, Nijmegen
Thomas van Aquinostraat 8.03.01 | +31 24 361 6277 | www.ru.nl/english/people/koning-a-de/

PI Reproducing Europe project www.reproducingeurope.nl ­| Chair of the Dutch Anthropological Association (Antropologen Beroepsvereniging) www.antropologen.nl

Call for papers (ASA-UK): Humanitarian imagination

The Humanitarian Imagination: Socialities and Materialities of Voluntarism

Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth Conference, Oxford Brookes 18-21 September

Dear colleagues,

We invite submissions to the panel “The Humanitarian Imagination: Socialities and Materialities of Voluntarism” for the ASA Conference in Oxford, 18-21 September. https://nomadit.co.uk/asa/asa2018/conferencesuite.php/panels/6887

SHORT ABSTRACT

Our panel aims to interrogate the ways in which volunteers imagine and engage with “others” through activities that involve relational processes and acts of self-making. The papers in this session will explore the role of the humanitarian imagination in animating and informing socialities and materialities of voluntarism.

LONG ABSTRACT

Volunteers are increasingly engaged in practices of gifting, service provision, material aid, and activism in relation to various “others”: refugees; immigrants; poor; homeless, but also with animals, and in the non-human and environmental realms. The session explores the ways in which humanitarian imaginations animate and inform forms of sociality and materiality. How do volunteers imagine themselves and others in humanitarian encounters? What political, moral, affective and ethical imaginaries accompany their motivations and experiences? In what ways do these imaginaries impact upon the material and social dimensions of voluntarism? What is the material form that aid acquires, and what are the relationships formed? Such questions can be directed at relationships between volunteers, between volunteers and those they seek to support and with material aid itself.

We are interested in the collective subjects that emerge through humanitarian imaginations. Historical studies underline how humanitarianism is interrelated to the emergence of humanity as a collective subject and a shared identity. What other collective subjects emerge in forms of sociality pertaining to humanitarianism today?

Through exploring the role of the humanitarian imagination in shaping volunteer encounters and experiences, we also seek to open up a space to consider the power of imaginative practice as a form of “imaginative politics” (Malkki 2015) that produces certain effects. We are hence particularly interested in papers that focus on the power dynamics of the humanitarian encounter, and that consider the potential of this encounter for social and political change.

Our section is Pol08. To submit your paper, please follow this link.https://nomadit.co.uk/asa/asa2018/conferencesuite.php/paperproposal/6887

We look forward to receiving thought-provoking and interesting papers!

Call for papers (AAA): Medical humanitarianism

Medical humanitarianism, human rights, and the suffering body

Despite their differences in goal, scale and mode of engagement, humanitarian and human rights practices often coalesce around the figure of the suffering body (Moyn, 2012). The centrality of the suffering body in humanitarianism and human rights activism has given the medical profession a privileged role in both attempts to save lives and alleviate suffering in times of crisis or emergency and processes of claims-making and justice-seeking (Abramowitz & Panter-Brick 2015; Ticktin, 2014).

Recent anthropological critiques of the use of the “suffering” as an analytical category (Robbins, 2013) and of the privileging of biological existence and processes (Das & Han, 2015) have important repercussions for a critical and ethnographically informed analysis of the role of medicine in humanitarian and human rights practices. These critiques point out the risks of reproducing the duality between regimes of care and regimes of recognition, or between biological wellbeing and political rights when exploring experiences of illness, care, healing and so on (Garcia, 2010; Stevenson, 2014).

This panel will focus on humanitarian or human rights “intervention” into the suffering biological body without reproducing the duality between alleviation of pain and realization of legal and political rights. We seek papers that will speak to these broad themes from a variety of ethnographic/topical areas. Some of the questions we are seeking answers to are:

·  How can we think about humanitarian or human rights “intervention” to end suffering without approaching the “object of care” either as a patient or a citizen?
·  What are the limitations of human rights and humanitarian practices in terms of people’s healing experiences in the aftermath of violence, conflict, war, famine and so on?
·  What kinds of affective worlds, political and ethical engagements are created in sites where the expert volunteers, victims of domestic or political violence and workers of humanitarian and human rights organizations have locally and historically shaped intimacies and hostilities?
·  What kind of new concepts can we draw from ethnographic work (Da Col & Graeber, 2011) on human rights and humanitarian practice that move beyond (but including) sovereignty, biopolitics, biosecurity and so on?

Call for Abstracts

We invite interested panelists to submit a paper title, abstract (250 words max), current affiliation and contact info to Salih Can Aciksoz ([email protected]) and Basak Can ([email protected]) by April 1, 2018. Decisions about acceptance of abstracts for these panels will be emailed by April 3, 2018.

Abramowitz, S. A., & Panter-Brick, C. (2015). Medical humanitarianism: ethnographies of practice. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Da Col, G., & Graeber, D. (2011). Foreword: The return of ethnographic theory. HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory, 1(1), vi–xxxv. https://doi.org/10.14318/hau1.1.001

Das, V., & Han, C. (2015). Living and dying in the contemporary world: a compendium. Oakland, California: University of California Press.

Garcia, A. (2010). The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession Along the Rio Grande. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Moyn, S. (2012). Substance, Scale, and Salience: The Recent Historiography of Human Rights. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 8(1), 123–140.

Robbins, J. (2013). Beyond the suffering subject: toward an anthropology of the good. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 19(3), 447–462.

Stevenson, L. (2014). Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic. Oakland, California: University of California Press.

Ticktin, M. (2014). Transnational Humanitarianism. Annual Review of Anthropology, 43(1), 273–289.