Call for papers and sessions: AAA in San Jose

Dear Colleagues,

The 117th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) will convene in San Jose, CA November  14 – 18, 2018 with the theme: “Resistance, Resilience, Adaptation.” As Program Co-Chairs, we encourage you to consider selecting The Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) to review your conference submissions. Below, you will find information to help you prepare for the meeting.

DATES: Abstract submissions for all proposal types opened on February 16, 2018. The deadline for all submissions to the AAA website is 3 PM EDT on Monday, April 16, 2018.

SESSION TYPES: AAA is committed to supporting a variety of session types this year. Conventional paper panels will remain the main format but do consider submitting ideas for other formats, including: poster panels; roundtables; retrospective sessions (intended to highlight career contributions of leading scholars); 5 minute, rapid, ‘flash’ presentations; installations. The full range can be viewed here: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2040

Panel organizers have one hour and forty-five minutes to work with, and there is a lot ASAP members can do to creatively maximize that time. A standard format allows for 4 x  15 minute papers and 10 minutes for discussant comments, but other ways of dividing the time are possible.

If you plan to present your work at the AAA, we encourage you to either organize or co-organize a session yourself or seek out others who are organizing one that relates to your research. (The ASAP listserv is a great forum for this). While we will do our best to organize individually submitted abstracts into sessions based on common themes, organized sessions have a greater success in being accepted, and are usually more coherent.

Invited Sessions are meant to present cutting-edge research and/or issues of interest to our entire section. Please note that ASAP considers all sessions submitted to our section for invited status. However, if you have questions about invited status or would like to draw our attention to your submission as a strong candidate for invited status, we encourage you to email us. We increase the likely number of Invited Sessions if we partner with other sections, so please consider this when putting a prospective panel together. The full list of sections and their interests can be found here: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1707

PARTICIPATION RULES AND POLICIES:  Before you make your plans, please see the Annual Meeting Particpation Rules here: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2017   Note that meeting participation is limited to AAA members (with some exceptions). Also, please note the One-Plus-One rule which means that participants may only: (1) present one paper/poster, or serve as a participant on one roundtable or installation and (2) accept no more than one discussant role elsewhere on the program. An individual may serve as organizer or chair of an unlimited number of sessions. These rules are strictly enforced by the AAA Program Committee.

SUBMISSION PORTAL:  Please remember that the AAA requires all participants to submit abstracts and proposals using the online submission portal which can be found here: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=1695&navItemNumber=696. Hopefully, this will prove to be less problematic than last year although the advice is to complete your submission as early as possible.

Please visit the AAA Conference Website  here:   http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/landing.aspx?ItemNumber=14722&navItemNumber=566 for more information about attending the meeting and feel free to contact us if you have any questions about the ASAP review process.

Warm greetings,
Paul Stubbs ([email protected]) and Carol MacLennan ([email protected])
ASAP 2018 Program Co-Chairs

 

Call for papers: AAA – Immigration

Dear ASAP Colleagues: This is a CFP for the AAA conference in San Jose, CA, Nov. 14-18, 2018, for the following panel:
 
Panel title:
Anti-Immigration, Anti-Gender: Toward an Anthropology of Gender, Sexuality, and Race in Central and Eastern Europe, and Russia.

Organizers:
Agnieszka Kościańska, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Ethnology and Cultural Anthropology
University of Warsaw, Poland

Joanna Mishtal, PhD
Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology
University of Central Florida, USA 

Panel Abstract:
In less than 30 years after democratic revolutions in Central and Eastern Europe, populist, far right and anti-European Union parties have either won elections or gained significant votes across the region. Anti-immigrant rhetoric and conservative notions of family values contributed greatly to their electoral successes. Populist and far right milieus protest loudly against hosting refugees and immigrants from Middle Eastern and African countries, often claiming that these “foreign” and “racially other” groups may threaten the fabric of the society, including women’s rights and safety, or LGBTQ rights. Some states explicitly warn against “Islamization” and therefore reject non-Christian refugees. Simultaneously, populist groups strongly oppose gender equality and reproductive and sexual rights. For example, conservative nationalist administrations in Poland and Hungary condemn contemporary approaches to understanding gender as sociocultural and political constructs by presenting them as a form of “family demise” and threats to the nation. Moreover, populists in this region tend to portray women’s or sexual rights as imposed by Western and European elites, attempting to destroy local identities based in the traditional gender order. The picture that is therefore emerging in this part of the world is that of growing racisms and (hetero)sexisms, emboldened by election outcomes.

This panel contributes to the anthropology scholarship on anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies, and “anti-genderism.” In recent years, anthropologists and other social scientists have analyzed extensively the region’s contemporary conflicts around migration/race and gender/sexuality, usually approaching them as two separate and distinct topics. This panel seeks to explore these lines of inquiry together.

Inspired by the conference themes of “Resistance, Resilience, and Adaptation,” we invite paper proposals that consider how racist anti-immigrant and anti-gender discourses, policies, and practices overlap, intersect, or interrelate in new populist rhetoric and governance in Central and Eastern Europe, and other post-Soviet regions, including Russia. We are particularity interested in empirically grounded and theoretically informed studies tracing these intersections on variously levels such as policies, media, everyday life, religion, education, healthcare, and civil society. We also welcome analyses of mobilization and movements in favor or against populist causes, including growing racism, (hetero)sexisms, and other forms of exclusion and social justice issues. 

Some of the questions this panel seeks to explore are:
What are the spaces of intersection between gender/sexuality and race/ethnicity in populist rhetoric and policies? How are anti-immigrant and “anti-genderism” discourses produced, maintained, and contested? What are the relationships between actors involved in anti-gender and anti-immigrant mobilization? What is a Central and Eastern European, or post-Soviet and post-socialist specificity, if any, of anti-immigrant rhetoric and anti-genderism? What are their historical, political, or cultural roots? What is the relationship between “traditional” xenophobia and patriarchal gender regimes? What are the new fears and anxieties underpinning and/or emerging from these contexts? What models of biopolitics, national identity, governance, moral economies, and discrimination emerge from the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality from these populist trends? How are these models contested? In what ways could anthropological knowledge contribute to resisting these trends and imagining a shared future?

Call for abstracts:

We invite interested panelists to submit abstracts of up to 250 words by March 15, 2018, via email to Agnieszka Kościańska – [email protected]  and Joanna Mishtal – [email protected]. Decisions about acceptance of abstracts for this panel will be emailed by March 20, 2018.

Please note:

AAA requires that everyone must register before April 16, 2018 for the conference at the time of submitting the panel proposal and presenters’ abstracts. Registration fee is refunded if a presenter is not accepted. Registration fee is lower for AAA members, therefore we recommend becoming a member and then registering. 

ASAP/AN column: Preview of ASAP panels at the AAA

The latest ASAP Anthropology News column is now available on line at:

http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/11/01/policy-matters/

The column is a review by Ted Powers of the ASAP panels that will be held at the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association in Washington, D.C. Note that a list of the panels is also available as a previous ASAP post, the durable link for which is:

http://asap.americananthro.org/asap-sessions-at-the-aaa-meeting-in-washington-d-c/

APLA off-site event at AAA in Washington

Dear ASAP members and friends,

I am reaching out to ask you to let you know about an offsite event in Washington that may be of interest. This year, APLA (Association for Political and Legal Anthropology) is holding a cocktail reception and roundtable discussion at Busboys & Poets, 14th and V location, 2021 14th St NW. It will be Thursday, November 30, at 7.45 pm. The event is called “Speaking Justice to Power: Anthropology Responds to the New World Disorder.”

Our roundtable discussion special guests are Orisanmi Burton, Laura Nader, Ayşe Parla, and Sara Shneiderman. Full details are available at:  https://wp.me/p1SS1c-1o4.

All the best,
Jennifer Curtis
Webmaster, Association for Political and Legal Anthropology

Joint SMA – ASAP session at AAA meeting in Washington

Become a Change Agent: Lessons from Experts Offered at Annual Meeting

November 30: 6:30-8:15
Omni Shoreham Hotel
Ambassador Ballroom

Want to influence public policy that shapes the health and wellbeing in the U.S. and elsewhere? Interested in learning about techniques that can impact how policy gets developed and implemented, or want to further hone your own advocacy skills? Going to the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association this year?

If so, please join the Society of Medical Anthropology (SMA) and the Association for the Anthropology of Policy (ASAP) for a co-hosted mentoring event on Thursday, November 30th between 6:30 pm and 8:15 pm. The event will be held in the Ambassador Ballroom of the Omni Shoreham Hotel and will include free yummy snacks, a cash bar, and two prominent speakers! This event (“How to Have an Impact on Health Policy: Lessons from Experts”) will focus on how we, as anthropologists, can be successful health policy advocates and change agents, focusing on the pragmatics of advocating for health policy by writing effectively for various media, collaborating with community organizations, and taking part in legislative processes.

The first speaker is Kathy Mulvey of the Climate and Energy Team at the Union of Concerned Scientists. For more than a quarter century, Kathy has worked in the trenches with researchers on policy analysis, campaigning, and legislative activity on a wide range of corporate accountability, environmental, and public health issues.

The second speaker is Ted Miller, a nationally-renowned economist and leading expert on injury and violence in the U.S. The author of over 250 publications, Ted will share his tried-and-true tips for engaging both media and policymakers on some of the most pressing social and health matters of our day, such as gun control.

Together, Kathy and Ted will school us how we can play a role in framing, enacting, and evaluating of health policy. After we hear from the speakers, audience participants will split up into expert-facilitated groups to brainstorm how to best implement these practices and troubleshoot their own ongoing efforts. If you are interested in hands-on help, feel free to bring any of your own advocacy materials (e.g., op-eds, policy briefs) for on-site input. This is one mentoring event not to be missed!

ASAP sessions at the AAA meeting in Washington, D.C.

ASAP Events  – AAA Washington DC
November 30 – December 3, 2017

Note to all:

Below is a list of ASAP sessions for the forthcoming AAA meeting, compiled by Carol MacLennan. We will be providing more detailed information later, but this will give you a head start. As you will see, there is some very unfortunate cross-scheduling.

Thursday, November 30

10:15 am – 12:00 pm
(3-0295) Future Matters: Anticipatory Knowledge and Scenario-Modeling
Christina Garsten, Stockholm University

10:15 am – 12:00 pm
(3-0495) Policing the Dead
Heidi Bauer-Clapp, U Mass, Amherst
Adam Zimmer, U Mass, Amherst

10:15 am – 12:15 pm
(3-410) The Academy and the Future of Freedom to Dissent (Roundtable)
Tracey Heatherington, U Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Jon Mitchell, U Sussex

12:15 – 1:30 pm
(3-0600) ASAP Executive Board Meeting

2:00 – 3:45 pm
(3-0915) How “Anthropology Matters” for Science (Roundtable)
Robert O’Malley, AAAS

2:00 – 3:45 pm
(3-0885) In Matters of Peace, Security, and Foreign Policy: Anthropological Engagement and the Power Elite
Elizabeth Hallowell, AFSC
Negar Razavi, U Penn

2:00-3:45 pm
(3-0880) Maintaining Refuge, Remaining Human (Roundtable)
Jane Howell, CSU Long Beach
David Haines, George Mason

4:15 – 6:00 pm
(3-1050) Intersections of Truth and Violence 
Natasha Zaretsky, Rutgers
Invited Session, Cosponsored with APLA

6:30 – 8:15 pm
(3-1510) ASAP Mentoring for Graduate Students and Emergent Scholars
Fayana Richards, Michigan State U  (organizer)
Mentoring Session

6:30 – 8:15 pm
(3-1505) How to Have an Impact on Health Policy: Lessons from Experts on Putting Anthropology into Action
Jennifer Hubbert, Lewis & Clark (organizer)
Mentoring Session, Co-Sponsored with SMA

Friday, December 1

8:00 – 9:45 am
(4-0140) Anthropological Approaches to Violence and Policy
Ventura Perez, U Mass, Amherst

8:00 – 9:45 am
(4-0155) The Effects of Recent Changes in National and International Governments and Policies on Refugee Experiences in Host Countries
Kelly Yotebieng, Ohio State U
Russell Manzano, U South Florida
Invited Session, Co-Sponsored with SUNTA

12:15 – 1:30 pm
(4-0585) ASAP Business Meeting

2:00 – 3:45 pm
(4-1010) Beyond Snowden: The Anthropology of Whistleblowing
Steven Sampson, Lund U
Cris Shore, U Auckland
Invited Session, Co-Sponsored with APLA

2:00 – 3:45 pm
(4-0870) Policy Times and the Temporalities of Policy
Paul Stubbs, Institute of Econ, Zagreb
Noemi Lendvai, U Bristol

2:00 – 3:45 pm
(4-0875) Rollback, Repeal, and Retrenchments: Anthropology and the Dismantling of Public Policy in the United States
Heide Castaneda, U South Florida
Jessica Mulligan, Providence College

Saturday, December 2

8:00 – 9:45 am
(5-0220) Screen-level Bureaucracy: Organizational Encounters in the Digitized and Automated World
Kelly McKowen, Princeton

10:15 am – 12:00 pm
(5-0560) Behind Policy: Societal Influences
Lilian Milanes, U Kentucky (chair; organized individual papers by C. MacLennan)

Sunday, December 3

8:00- 9:00 am
(6-0093) Readers Meet Authors:  Challenging the Prevailing Paradigm for Displacement and Resettlement: Implications for Social Policy and Legal Normative Frameworks (Roundtable)
Michael Cernea

10:15 am – 12:00 pm
(6-0310) Medical Anthropology in the Trump Era: Transitional Engagement, Activism, and Resistance beyond Academic Frontiers
Thurka Sangaramoorthy, U Maryland, College Park
Invited Session, Co-Sponsored with SMA

ASAP monthly update — September 2017

Notable recently

The latest ASAP column for Anthropology News has just been published: “In the Loop and Off the Record” by Negar Razavi. It is a condensed version of last year’s ASAP graduate student paper prize.

http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2017/09/19/in-the-loop-and-off-the-record

Coming up

The next Instagram guest contributor will be Eric Cheng. If you miss the daily posts, you can still find the full set at @anthofpolicy. Note that we are always glad to add additional Instagram guest editors — basically an arrangement to do a series of six to eight photos and captions over about a two week period. If you are interested, please contact Georgia Hartman at: [email protected]

ASAP will have the following four invited sessions for the AAA meetings in Washington this fall:

(1) Medical Anthropology in the Trump Era, co-sponsored with the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA)
(2) The Effects of Recent Changes in National and International Governments on Refugee Experiences in Host Countries, co-sponsored with the Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology (SUNTA)
(3) Beyond Snowden: The Anthropology of Whistleblowing, co-sponsored with the Association for Political and Legal Anthropology (APLA)
(4) Intersections of Truth and Violence, also co-sponsored with APLA

More detail on these and our other sessions will be circulated on the this list, with additional material on Facebook, beginning about October 1.

ASAP’s work with SUNTA on refugees continues. A collection of about twenty essays on maintaining refuge is in final production for both web and print. Expected publication is October or November.

As always you can find us . . .

. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: [email protected] or [email protected]
David Haines for the web at: [email protected]
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: [email protected]
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: [email protected]
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers regarding the ASAP column in AN at: [email protected] and [email protected]
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: [email protected]

Call for papers: Seizures of power (Brazil and Turkey)

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Golpe/ Darbe: Seizures of Power in Brazil and Turkey

There are many parallels to be drawn between the 2016 impeachment in Brazil and the 2017 coup attempt in Turkey. This panel invites scholars working on Latin America and the Middle East to engage in what we hope to be an ongoing conversation about the theoretical, methodological, and political dilemmas we face when we look at golpe and darbe together as grounded experiences of power.

What do these two political events imply for discourses of democratization and transitional justice in Brazil, Turkey, and beyond? In what ways are they becoming another past to reckon with, with whose voices? What are the implications of these large-scale political processes on writing histories and ethnographies?

The intricate histories of state–society relations and political economy in both Brazil and Turkey will provide rich grounds for a productive discussion, on issues such as: corruption, constitutionalism, populism, state legitimacy, citizenship, accountability, the ruling elite, lawfare, “legal coup”, revenge/ purge, economic violence, scales of justice, the role of the media, technologies of truth and evidence.

Please send abstracts (max. 250 words) with titles and keywords to the organizer Hande Sarikuzu ([email protected]) by April 11, 2017. Participants will be notified by April 12, 2017. Please note that all participants must be registered to attend the AAA Annual Meeting by 5:00 pm on Friday, April 14 to appear in the program.

Call for papers: Teaching interventions

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Empathy Matters: Teaching Interventions in a Time of Intensive Inequality and Division

Organizers:
Madelaine Adelman, Justice & Social Inquiry, Arizona State University, [email protected]
Nora Haenn, Anthropology and International Studies, North Carolina State University, [email protected]

Call for Five (5) Presenters on Proposed Roundtable:

If interested, please send us your name, email address, institutional affiliation, issue or subject matter, name of course and degree program or educational context, and brief description of your approach to social empathy. We aim to create a diverse roundtable per the outline below. Note that “presenter” counts as a “major role” for individual participation at AAA meeting.

This roundtable focuses on the pragmatics of teaching empathy during a period of heightened politicization of difference. Inspired by social work scholar Elizabeth Segal’s notion of “social empathy,” this roundtable brings together participants who seek to cultivate and reinforce empathy as a skill required of an informed and educated, politically-engaged public. Segal distinguishes between “interpersonal empathy” and “social empathy.” Interpersonal empathy comprises two main components: 1) the affective physiological response to another’s experience; and 2) the cognitive mental processing where one distinguishes between self and other while taking into account another person’s perspective (Gerdes & Segal, 2009, p. 120, Segal, 2013). According to Segal, social empathy is “the ability to understand people by perceiving or experiencing their life situations and as a result gain insight into structural inequalities and disparities” (Segal, 2007, 2011, 2013). Social empathy builds on interpersonal empathy by recognizing the conditions that create inequalities, and by imagining what it is like to be part of another group. Humans are more likely to identify with and consider deserving of assistance those who “look like us.” Thus, cultivating social empathy includes exposure, explanation and experience to difference across human history, culture, and lifespan. Because social empathy includes an understanding of structural inequalities, students trained in social empathy may better identify steps toward social change and more effectively shape public policy, social movements, or other pathways to justice (Segal, 2013).

In order to explore how educators have addressed social empathy in the classroom, as well as ideas resonant with the more formal framework, this roundtable brings together participants whose work on various identity differences (e.g. race, migration status, gender and sexuality, party affiliation, Israel/Palestine, etc.) has taken on amplified meaning in today’s political atmosphere. As teachers, how do we effectively teach social empathy in our diverse academic settings and across different levels of student engagement? How do we do so in light of the specific political concerns surrounding particular identity formations and our students’ positions within those formations? Participants will explain their rationale for incorporating empathy, either implicitly or explicitly in the classroom, and reflect on and assess novel as well as time-tested pedagogical approaches to empathy as either a teaching tool (i.e. a means to reach a related but unique outcome) or as a goal (i.e. the intended outcome itself).  Overall, the roundtable aims to reinforce the ways we, as educators, can help students move beyond feeling and understanding to action based on a sense of social responsibility (Segal, 2011, p. 268).

Gerdes, K. & Segal, E.A. (2009). A Social Work Model of Empathy. Advances in Social Work, 10, 2, pp. 114-127.

Segal, E.A. (2013). Social Empathy: Using Interpersonal Skills to Effect Change, 25th National Symposium on Doctoral Research in Social Work, Invited Keynote Speaker, Ohio State University College of Social Work, Columbus, OH.

Segal, E.A. (2011) Social Empathy: A Model Built on Empathy, Contextual Understanding, and Social Responsibility That Promotes Social Justice. Journal of Social Service Research, 37, 3, pp. 266-277.

Segal, E.A. (2007). Social empathy: A new paradigm to address poverty. Journal of Poverty: Innovations on Social, Political, & Economic Inequalities, 11, 3, pp. 65–81.