ASAP update — Summer 2017

Notable recently

The latest print edition of Anthropology News includes section-by-section essays. For ASAP, Judi Pajo and Ted Powers pulled together some thoughts on ASAP’s goals and hopes, mostly from current officers. Take a look and think if we are moving on course or need adjustments.

For those of you who have been following our joint focus with SUNTA on refuge in troubled times, a series of essays has now appeared as an In Focus segment in Anthropology News at:

http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/category/in-focus/maintaining-refuge/

ASAP and SUNTA are also working on publishing two other sets of essays on maintaining refuge, one as a second In Focus segment in Anthropology News and another as a free-standing print/web publication. Our two sections will also have several sessions on refugees and other migrants at the AAA meeting in DC.

Coming up

If you are in the field this summer and would like to be a guest editor for our Instagram process, please contact Georgia Hartman at: ghartman@uci.edu

In Fall, we will begin a series of focus segments on social media, highlighting some of the sessions coming up at the Washington meetings. We will let you know when those begin.

Our next Anthropology News column will be Negar Razavi’s “In the Loop and Off the Record: Power and the Washington Establishment” — an abridged version of last year’s ASAP Best Graduate Paper.

As always you can find us . . .

. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: chengsk@ucalgary.ca or asaplistmanager@gmail.com
David Haines for the web at: dhaines1@gmu.edu
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: ghartman@uci.edu
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: camac@mtu.edu
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers regarding the ASAP column in AN at: theodore-powers@uiowa.edu and jpajo@pace.edu
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: jasonbartscott@yahoo.com

ASAP monthly update – April 2017

Notable this past month

ASAP has added a new category of sustaining membership at $25. Consider that when you renew — it will help us expand our efforts on behalf of students.Note that the basic dues structure remains the same: $10 for regular members and $5 for students.

The number of our Facebook followers is closing in on 400. That is good progress — and thanks to Jason Scott.

Remember you can always access ASAP AN columns on the “ASAP Forum” tab on our web page: anthofpolicy.org

Coming up

The program for the AAA in Washington is looking good, although the online submission process has been exceedingly difficult and the deadline has been postponed until Tuesday, April 18. Note that one highlight in Washington will be a second mentorship-directed ASAP session. Details will follow later on.

The ASAP column in the forthcoming print version of Anthropology News features personal comments from ASAP members about how they see the anthropology of policy. Thanks to Judi Pajo and Ted Powers for setting this up.

The month’s Instagram guest contributor is James M. Hundley (May 1-15). James is a sociocultural anthropologist at Binghamton University in New York who works in the borderlands of the Pacific Northwest. His research explores the ways in which the Coast Salish First Nations are overcoming the obstacles presented by increased security pressures at the international border in the 21st century. Follow him at @anthofpolicy May 1-15 to see how a cultural revitalization project of canoe families from around the region paddle for days or weeks to a host community, and explore environmental protests that have united indigenous and non-native allies to reject oil pipeline and coal projects in the region.

The joint efforts on refugee issues between ASAP and SUNTA (Society for Urban, National, and Transnational/Global Anthropology) continue. An “In Focus” set of essays will appear in Anthropology News in about a month and a stand-alone volume is scheduled to be out in September. Note that similar cooperative efforts with other AAA sections on other selected topics might be extremely useful.

As always you can find us . . .
. . . on the web at anthofpolicy.org
. . . on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter as @anthofpolicy

Key contacts

Eric Cheng for the listserv at: chengsk@ucalgary.ca or asaplistmanager@gmail.com
David Haines for the web at: dhaines1@gmu.edu
Georgia Hartman for Instagram at: ghartman@uci.edu
Carol MacLennan for the ASAP program in Washington at: camac@mtu.edu
Judi Pajo and Ted Powers regarding the ASAP column in AN at: theodore-powers@uiowa.edu and jpajo@pace.edu
Jason Scott for Facebook and Twitter at: jasonbartscott@yahoo.com

New ASAP sustaining membership option

Our interim Treasurer Rebecca Peters notes there is now an option to be a sustaining member of ASAP for $25. When you renew your AAA membership, please consider making this small donation to our association as it will help us grow our resource base more quickly. We are now able to offer the graduate student essay prize, for instance, and look forward to funding more activities for our members as we are able.

Otherwise our ASAP dues structure remains the same: $10 for regular members and $5 for students.

Call for papers: Seizures of power (Brazil and Turkey)

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Golpe/ Darbe: Seizures of Power in Brazil and Turkey

There are many parallels to be drawn between the 2016 impeachment in Brazil and the 2017 coup attempt in Turkey. This panel invites scholars working on Latin America and the Middle East to engage in what we hope to be an ongoing conversation about the theoretical, methodological, and political dilemmas we face when we look at golpe and darbe together as grounded experiences of power.

What do these two political events imply for discourses of democratization and transitional justice in Brazil, Turkey, and beyond? In what ways are they becoming another past to reckon with, with whose voices? What are the implications of these large-scale political processes on writing histories and ethnographies?

The intricate histories of state–society relations and political economy in both Brazil and Turkey will provide rich grounds for a productive discussion, on issues such as: corruption, constitutionalism, populism, state legitimacy, citizenship, accountability, the ruling elite, lawfare, “legal coup”, revenge/ purge, economic violence, scales of justice, the role of the media, technologies of truth and evidence.

Please send abstracts (max. 250 words) with titles and keywords to the organizer Hande Sarikuzu (hsariku1@binghamton.edu) by April 11, 2017. Participants will be notified by April 12, 2017. Please note that all participants must be registered to attend the AAA Annual Meeting by 5:00 pm on Friday, April 14 to appear in the program.

Call for papers: Teaching interventions

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Empathy Matters: Teaching Interventions in a Time of Intensive Inequality and Division

Organizers:
Madelaine Adelman, Justice & Social Inquiry, Arizona State University, mad@asu.edu
Nora Haenn, Anthropology and International Studies, North Carolina State University, nmhaenn@ncsu.edu

Call for Five (5) Presenters on Proposed Roundtable:

If interested, please send us your name, email address, institutional affiliation, issue or subject matter, name of course and degree program or educational context, and brief description of your approach to social empathy. We aim to create a diverse roundtable per the outline below. Note that “presenter” counts as a “major role” for individual participation at AAA meeting.

This roundtable focuses on the pragmatics of teaching empathy during a period of heightened politicization of difference. Inspired by social work scholar Elizabeth Segal’s notion of “social empathy,” this roundtable brings together participants who seek to cultivate and reinforce empathy as a skill required of an informed and educated, politically-engaged public. Segal distinguishes between “interpersonal empathy” and “social empathy.” Interpersonal empathy comprises two main components: 1) the affective physiological response to another’s experience; and 2) the cognitive mental processing where one distinguishes between self and other while taking into account another person’s perspective (Gerdes & Segal, 2009, p. 120, Segal, 2013). According to Segal, social empathy is “the ability to understand people by perceiving or experiencing their life situations and as a result gain insight into structural inequalities and disparities” (Segal, 2007, 2011, 2013). Social empathy builds on interpersonal empathy by recognizing the conditions that create inequalities, and by imagining what it is like to be part of another group. Humans are more likely to identify with and consider deserving of assistance those who “look like us.” Thus, cultivating social empathy includes exposure, explanation and experience to difference across human history, culture, and lifespan. Because social empathy includes an understanding of structural inequalities, students trained in social empathy may better identify steps toward social change and more effectively shape public policy, social movements, or other pathways to justice (Segal, 2013).

In order to explore how educators have addressed social empathy in the classroom, as well as ideas resonant with the more formal framework, this roundtable brings together participants whose work on various identity differences (e.g. race, migration status, gender and sexuality, party affiliation, Israel/Palestine, etc.) has taken on amplified meaning in today’s political atmosphere. As teachers, how do we effectively teach social empathy in our diverse academic settings and across different levels of student engagement? How do we do so in light of the specific political concerns surrounding particular identity formations and our students’ positions within those formations? Participants will explain their rationale for incorporating empathy, either implicitly or explicitly in the classroom, and reflect on and assess novel as well as time-tested pedagogical approaches to empathy as either a teaching tool (i.e. a means to reach a related but unique outcome) or as a goal (i.e. the intended outcome itself).  Overall, the roundtable aims to reinforce the ways we, as educators, can help students move beyond feeling and understanding to action based on a sense of social responsibility (Segal, 2011, p. 268).

Gerdes, K. & Segal, E.A. (2009). A Social Work Model of Empathy. Advances in Social Work, 10, 2, pp. 114-127.

Segal, E.A. (2013). Social Empathy: Using Interpersonal Skills to Effect Change, 25th National Symposium on Doctoral Research in Social Work, Invited Keynote Speaker, Ohio State University College of Social Work, Columbus, OH.

Segal, E.A. (2011) Social Empathy: A Model Built on Empathy, Contextual Understanding, and Social Responsibility That Promotes Social Justice. Journal of Social Service Research, 37, 3, pp. 266-277.

Segal, E.A. (2007). Social empathy: A new paradigm to address poverty. Journal of Poverty: Innovations on Social, Political, & Economic Inequalities, 11, 3, pp. 65–81.

Call for papers: New refugee movements

American Anthropological Association Annual Meeting
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

In-Between States: New Refugee Movements and State Responses

Organizers:
Caitlin Fouratt (Caitlin.Fouratt@csulb.edu), CSU, Long Beach
Leila Rodriguez (leila.rodriguez@uc.edu), University of Cincinnati
Joseph Wiltberger (joseph.wiltberger@csun.edu), CSU, Northridge

The current U.S. administration’s attempts to block refugee flows to the U.S., as well as anti-refugee sentiment and immigration restrictions in other receiving countries, points to recent shifts toward rejecting refugees and the claims of asylum-seekers by states supposedly expected to be able to absorb such flows and to follow international guidelines to recognize refugees arriving at their door. We are witnessing a moment when the international asylum regime is being challenged and resisted, which has resulted in new and unexpected migratory flows and social consequences.

“Traditional” countries of resettlement are turning to other countries of refuge, offshore processing centers, and other solutions to prevent the arrival of refugees or delay permanent resettlement. Linked to this is the recent observation of refugee/asylee flows toward less expected destinations, their liminal permanence in transit and in-between states, as well as questions about how those unexpected states are handling new influxes. European states and the U.S. have responded to the Syrian refugee crisis with immigration restrictions in a climate of intense xenophobia. Mexico and Costa Rica have become the hosts of significant numbers of Haitians, West Africans, and “Northern Triangle” Central Americans. These groups, among others, encounter heightened border enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border and at borders further south, making it more difficult to reach the U.S. Further, the U.S. is now looking to Central American countries to create mechanisms for identifying and vetting asylum-seekers in place, including a Transfer Protection Agreement with Costa Rica. Globally, refugees and asylum-seekers can be found taking extreme risks or waiting indefinitely to cross international borders, in detention en masse, and settling in unexpected places.

Building on scholarship on refugee policy and the proliferation of precarious statuses, this panel seeks papers that examine the theoretical, political, and social implications of these shifts. We invite papers that address human rights consequences of deporting or denying entry to those fleeing violence and persecution; the political and social responses of states where asylum seekers are unexpectedly arriving; and ethnographic examinations of the situation of refugees caught in limbo or found in new places. What happens when countries of transit become de facto countries of settlement? When temporary arrangements become permanent or extend indefinitely?  What role can anthropology play in the examination of the experiences of refugees  and asylum seekers caught in these in-between states?

Please e-mail proposed paper titles and abstracts (max. 250 words) to the organizers listed above by 5:00 pm, April 7th. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by April 9th.

 

Call for papers: Screen-level bureaucracy

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Screen-level Bureaucracy: Organizational Encounters in the Digitized and Automated World

Organizer: Kelly McKowen, Princeton University
Abstracts are due to mckowen@princeton.edu by April 7

The traditional image of the encounter between an individual and a bureaucratic organization involves at least two actors meeting physically across a desk or a table. As a growing share of private and public organizations embrace digitization, automation, and artificial intelligence, however, this image has become in many cases a poor representation of how people actually meet and experience bureaucracy. From banks and businesses to schools and welfare offices, many of the organizations people interact with present themselves less through physical, built spaces and more via the computer-, tablet-, and mobile phone-mediated artifacts of the digital world. In turn, the experience of bureaucracy, which previous ethnographic and qualitative scholarship has shown be a significant space of political claim-making and the formation of shared ideas about the self, society, and the economy, is undergoing dramatic shifts.

Tracking these shifts and their impacts in different parts of the world represents a significant opportunity for anthropologists to play a central role in answering some of the critical questions that will shape scholarship on bureaucratic organizations moving forward. These questions include: How does digitization of the bureaucratic exterior affect transparency and trust between organizations and their users? How do different technologies of contact—e.g. web portals, teleconferencing, long-distance learning, robo-advising, etc.—distribute, delimit, or eliminate discretion, power, and agency at the street-level? Which spaces of contact and modes of claim-making have been opened and closed by the burgeoning virtual presence of different organizations? How do digital documents and templates affect the abilities of users and bureaucracies to communicate with—and understand—one another? And how do varying mixes of virtual and physical bureaucratic experience impact the ways people understand the nature of the state, the corporation, the trade union, etc.?

This panel invites papers which engage any aspect of the virtual and/or automated relationship between individuals and bureaucratic organizations. If you are interested, please send a title and abstract of no more than 250 words to mckowen@princeton.edu by April 7, 2017. Selected panelists will be notified shortly thereafter.

Kelly McKowen
PhD Candidate, Anthropology
Princeton University
mckowen@princeton.edu

Call for papers: Famine in Africa

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

African Nations Confronting Famine 2017

Please consider the attached CFP and circulate to any person or group who may be interested.  I would also be delighted to have a volunteer as co-organizer/chair.

Please send expressions of interest and comments asap and no later than 31 March. Include the geographic area and topical issue(s) you would like to address. I want to have time to rewrite the abstract in light of participants’ interests.

Note that as a Roundtable contributor
•  you do not need to write an abstract,
•   you do need to register by 12 April—10 April would be better—at the AAA website with AAA dues paid or membership waiver (I know the final final date is 14 April but I am going to need those last days to make final organizational adjustments and to pull my hair out as AAA system falls over in final rush as usual.)
•  you will speak 5-10 minutes, then participate in discussion with audience and panel
•  your participation counts as your major role under the AAA 1 plus 1 rule

I am interested in bringing this unfolding tragedy to the attention of as wide an audience as possible, as well as probing the ways anthropology/-ists can make a difference here, so I invite comment and suggestion from everyone, whether or not you wish to be on the panel.

Many thanks,

Diane
Anthropology Program
School of Social & Cultural Studies
Victoria University
PO Box 600
Wellington 6140
NEW ZEALAND
diane.orourke@vuw.ac.nz

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Update on AAA annual meeting

Dear ASAP Colleagues,

The deadline for submitting your 2017 AAA Session Proposals is coming up – Friday, April 14.

We are seeing good calls for proposals listed here.  We encourage you to consider ASAP as a reviewing section for the DC meetings, themed Anthropology Matters!   This year we are also at a venue and time when policy matters.

A few things you should consider:

Invited Status: We hope to have one or two Invited Sessions this year.  If you are interested in having your roundtable or paper session be considered as “Invited,” please contact me (camac@mtu.edu) in advance to let me know of your interest and a few words about how your panel contributes to the anthropology of policy.   An invited panel or roundtable should reflect the ASAP mission and be well conceived. Submit your proposal at the regular deadline. The ASAP Program Committee will consider these sessions along with the others during the review period.  For more information see the section on invited sessions: http://www.americananthro.org/AttendEvents/Content.aspx?ItemNumber=2040

Guest Registration Program:  Do you have a non-anthropologist or an international participant on your panel?  ASAP has one “guest” we can request from AAA and we (ASAP)  must apply by March 31. Registration fees and membership are paid.  See information below on who qualifies for “guest registration.” Please notify me soon if you wish to apply for one of your participants (camac@mtu.edu) and provide this information:
o   First and last name. Affiliation email address. Mailing address. Country of residence
o   Abstract for the session in which s/he will participate.  Abstract for paper.
o   A short statement about why s/he should receive the award

Submit your panels early:  AAA is working with new online submission system and review software.  I encourage you to submit your electronic proposals early to avoid the last minute potential for problems.

We look forward to reviewing your proposals.  Please contact me if you have any questions.

Carol MacLennan
ASAP 2017 Program Chair
camac@mtu.edu

Call for papers: Ethnographies of commoning

Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association
Washington, D.C., November 29 – December 3, 2017

Urban Ethnographies of Commoning

This panel aims to bring into conversation ethnographic case studies on forms of urban living created through acts of commoning –spaces imagined and lived as urban commons, belonging to no one and everyone.

We aim to reflect upon urban inhabitants’ commoning practices that produce and reproduce life in the city for the sake of cultivating a new ethos to sustain livelihoods and affirm communal instincts beyond motivations of profit, competition, and wealth spared for individual well-being at the expense of others. We would like to explore everyday cultures of commoning that rely on alternative socio-spatial relations. It is our aim to take a close look at urban inhabitants’ quotidian practices, be they work, reproductive labor, or leisure and festivity, that make our spaces in common despite (and in the midst of) capitalist social relationships.

Everyday acts of commoning materialize within the cracks of the capitalist system and potentially create new life-forms. We treasure such practices of commoning, for they not only reveal urban inhabitants’ capacity to make the city but they also imply a radical will to remake ourselves and our lives by way of reorganizing our everyday lives, living spaces, redefining forms of production and labor, developing new means of livelihood, and in turn reminding us every day that we all inhabit a common life-world.

We would like to highlight both achievements and drawbacks. We dwell on the emancipatory potentials of commoning practices, as well as the incomplete or conflicting processes and incompatibilities they inhabit. We focus on cases of urban commoning while keeping an eye on their continuous enclosures.

What are some of the ways in which we can imagine and sustain our ongoing everyday lives as a locus of commoning? What kinds of sensibilities and perspectives (for instance a feminist perspective) can we incorporate into our understanding of urban commons?

This panel aims to discuss these questions by bringing together ethnographic case studies from different urban contexts, to discuss alternative forms of production, consumption, exchange, and sociality, all relying on practices of commoning as their major resource.

We are calling for empirically informed papers that offer refreshing perspectives on the following:

* Precarity and resistance
* Solidarity economies
* Commoning arts & culture in the city
* Commoning and law
* Commoning and affective labor in the city
* Experiences of commoning urban property
* Sustainable urban life

Please send abstracts (of 250 words) and bios (of 200 words) by April 3rd to Derya Özkan (derya.ozkan@ieu.edu.tr) and Güldem Baykal Büyüksaraç (guldem.baykal@istanbul.edu.tr).